Overall Statistics

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast
Description:
Brendan, Richard, Todd and Nathan discuss the entire history of Doctor Who, season by season.

Homepage: http://www.flightthroughentirety.com/

RSS Feed: http://feeds.podtrac.com/QivDlm8raO5C

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast Statistics
Episodes:
395
Average Episode Duration:
58:26
Longest Episode Duration:
2:46:16
Total Duration of all Episodes:
16 days, 0 hours, 38 minutes and 11 seconds
Earliest Episode:
18 November 2018 (5:24am GMT)
Latest Episode:
11 November 2018 (6:57am GMT)
Average Time Between Episodes:
4 days, 3 hours, 1 minute and 56 seconds

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast Episodes

  • Episode 34: Choc Bit Breast Plates

    4 July 2015 (10:26pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 32 minutes and 58 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, Flight Through Entirety is on location in Dartmoor, testing our resistance to fear, burning, pressure, fluid deprivation and immersion in liquids, as we discuss the third story of Tom Baker's first season, The Sontaran Experiment.

    Buy the story!

    The Sontaran Experiment was released on DVD in 2006/2007. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Fans of posh white people living in orbital space stations will enjoy The Ark in Space, of course, and also Elysium (2013), which makes reasonably good use of Jodie Foster, whatever Brendan says.

    Fans of dead teenagers will enjoy The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974).

    Dr Josef Mengele worked as an SS Officer in Auschwitz and performed brutal and sadistic experiments on some of the prisoners, as well as assigning many to the gas chambers.

    Fans of the Sontaran insectoid robot will enjoy this photograph of the Canada Water Library in Southwark, which looks remarkably like it.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is here too. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll hide an inflatable snake somewhere where you least expect to find it.



  • Episode 33: A Beneficent God

    27 June 2015 (11:30pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 27 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Todd has given that helmic regulator quite a twist, I'm afraid, and we've found ourselves in the year 16,087, on a space station being menaced by bubble wrap and fibreglass ants. And still it's one of the best Doctor Who stories to date. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you The Ark in Space.

    Buy the story!

    The Ark in Space Special Edition was released on DVD in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The novelisation, Doctor Who and the Ark in Space, written by Ian Marter himself, was re-released to celebrate Doctor Who's 50th anniversary in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Fans of this story and of Revelation of the Daleks will enjoy a delicious serving of Soylent Green (1973). (Spoilers: It's people.)

    Sorry, dear listeners, we don't have any pictures of Ian Marter being giantly muscular. And don't think I didn't spend time looking.

    This article from the Darwin's God blog discusses the life cycle of the ichneumon wasp and its impact on 19th-century theology.

    J. V. McConnell, (1962) "Memory transfer through cannibalism in planarium", Journal of Neuropsychiatry 3 suppl 1 542-548. (See, we can be academically rigorous if we put our minds to it.)

    This article from the website of the American Psychological Association discusses the history of James McConnell's article.

    I'm not sure that Ridley Scott has ever actually admitted to ripping off this story in his film Alien (1979), but that hasn't stopped people from speculating about the possibility.

    We haven't yet managed to upload Todd's interview with Lis Sladen, but we promise we're working on it. Keep an eye out for an announcement in the shownotes over the next few episodes. In the meantime, you can enjoy Lis Sladen's second appearance in this 1972 episode of Z Cars, directed by The Underwater Menace's Julia Smith.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard adores all of you and can't wait to chat to each and every one of you in person. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll install an intruder defence mechanism in your wardrobe and blow up all your shoes.



  • A Beneficent God

    27 June 2015 (11:30pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 27 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Todd has given that helmic regulator quite a twist, I'm afraid, and we've found ourselves in the year 16,087, on a space station being menaced by bubble wrap and fibreglass ants. And still it's one of the best Doctor Who stories to date. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you The Ark in Space.

    Buy the story!

    The Ark in Space Special Edition was released on DVD in 2013. (Amazon US)
    (Amazon UK)

    The novelisation, Doctor Who and the Ark in Space, written by Ian Marter himself, was re-released to celebrate Doctor Who's 50th anniversary in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Fans of this story and of Revelation of the Daleks will enjoy a delicious serving of Soylent Green (1973). (Spoilers: It's people.)

    Sorry, dear listeners, we don't have any pictures of Ian Marter being giantly muscular. And don't think I didn't spend time looking.

    This article from the Darwin's God blog discusses the life cycle of the ichneumon wasp and its impact on 19th-century theology.

    J. V. McConnell, (1962) "Memory transfer through cannibalism in planarium", Journal of Neuropsychiatry 3 suppl 1 542-548. (See, we can be academically rigorous if we put our minds to it.)

    This article from the website of the American Psychological Association discusses the history of James McConnell's article.

    I'm not sure that Ridley Scott has ever actually admitted to ripping off this story in his film Alien (1979), but that hasn't stopped people from speculating about the possibility.

    We haven't yet managed to upload Todd's interview with Lis Sladen, but we promise we're working on it. Keep an eye out for an announcement in the shownotes over the next few episodes. In the meantime, you can enjoy Lis Sladen's second appearance in this 1972 episode of Z Cars, directed by The Underwater Menace's Julia Smith.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard adores all of you and can't wait to chat to each and every one of you in person. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll install an intruder defence mechanism in your wardrobe and blow up all your shoes.



  • Episode 33 A Beneficent God

    27 June 2015 (11:30pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 27 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Todd has given that helmic regulator quite a twist, I'm afraid, and we've found ourselves in the year 16,087, on a space station being menaced by bubble wrap and fibreglass ants. And still it's one of the best Doctor Who stories to date. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you The Ark in Space.

    Buy the story!

    The Ark in Space Special Edition was released on DVD in 2013. (Amazon US)
    (Amazon UK)

    The novelisation, Doctor Who and the Ark in Space, written by Ian Marter himself, was re-released to celebrate Doctor Who's 50th anniversary in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Fans of this story and of Revelation of the Daleks will enjoy a delicious serving of Soylent Green (1973). (Spoilers: It's people.)

    Sorry, dear listeners, we don't have any pictures of Ian Marter being giantly muscular. And don't think I didn't spend time looking.

    This article from the Darwin's God blog discusses the life cycle of the ichneumon wasp and its impact on 19th-century theology.

    J. V. McConnell, (1962) "Memory transfer through cannibalism in planarium", Journal of Neuropsychiatry 3 suppl 1 542-548. (See, we can be academically rigorous if we put our minds to it.)

    This article from the website of the American Psychological Association discusses the history of James McConnell's article.

    I'm not sure that Ridley Scott has ever actually admitted to ripping off this story in his film Alien (1979), but that hasn't stopped people from speculating about the possibility.

    We haven't yet managed to upload Todd's interview with Lis Sladen, but we promise we're working on it. Keep an eye out for an announcement in the shownotes over the next few episodes. In the meantime, you can enjoy Lis Sladen's second appearance in this 1972 episode of Z Cars, directed by The Underwater Menace's Julia Smith.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard adores all of you and can't wait to chat to each and every one of you in person. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll install an intruder defence mechanism in your wardrobe and blow up all your shoes.



  • Quentin Crisp Duck Face

    20 June 2015 (9:51pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 34 minutes and 38 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    We have a new Doctor, and a new release schedule. In the first weekly episode of Flight Through Entirety, Brendan, Nathan, Richard and Todd, the sort of girls who give motorcars pet names, discuss Tom Baker's first ever Doctor Who story, Robot. Please do not resist. We do not wish to cause you unnecessary pain.

    Buy the story!

    Robot was released on DVD in 2007. (Amazon US)
    (Amazon UK)

    Terrance Dicks's novelisation, Doctor Who and the Giant Robot, is available as an audiobook, read by Tom Baker. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Links and notes

    Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) has an emotional artificial person with a complex relationship with his creator. Coincidence?

    Pearl White played the eponymous heroine in the 1914 film serial The Perils of Pauline. Apparently she never got tied to the railway tracks though.

    Fans of terribly judgemental robots will enjoy Gort from George Pal's The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951).

    Anyone appalled by Richard's gingerphobia will perhaps be mollified by this video depicting Catherine Tate's admission to the Ginger Hair Safe House.

    If, like me, you're disappointed that Miss Bassey won't be singing the theme to the next Bond film, SPECTRE, you can console yourself by remembering the valiant It's Got To Be Bassey campaign. Bless you, boys.

    Some moments in this story are reminiscent of Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke's second-season Avengers episode The Mauritius Penny, which exists on YouTube in its, er, entirety.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is just someone who loves life. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll just keep nagging you about it every episode for the next few weeks.



  • Episode 32 Quentin Crisp Duck Face

    20 June 2015 (9:51pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 34 minutes and 38 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    We have a new Doctor, and a new release schedule. In the first weekly episode of Flight Through Entirety, Brendan, Nathan, Richard and Todd, the sort of girls who give motorcars pet names, discuss Tom Baker's first ever Doctor Who story, Robot. Please do not resist. We do not wish to cause you unnecessary pain.

    Buy the story!

    Robot was released on DVD in 2007. (Amazon US)
    (Amazon UK)

    Terrance Dicks's novelisation, Doctor Who and the Giant Robot, is available as an audiobook, read by Tom Baker. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Links and notes

    Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) has an emotional artificial person with a complex relationship with his creator. Coincidence?

    Pearl White played the eponymous heroine in the 1914 film serial The Perils of Pauline. Apparently she never got tied to the railway tracks though.

    Fans of terribly judgemental robots will enjoy Gort from George Pal's The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951).

    Anyone appalled by Richard's gingerphobia will perhaps be mollified by this video depicting Catherine Tate's admission to the Ginger Hair Safe House.

    If, like me, you're disappointed that Miss Bassey won't be singing the theme to the next Bond film, SPECTRE, you can console yourself by remembering the valiant It's Got To Be Bassey campaign. Bless you, boys.

    Some moments in this story are reminiscent of Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke's second-season Avengers episode The Mauritius Penny, which exists on YouTube in its, er, entirety.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is just someone who loves life. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll just keep nagging you about it every episode for the next few weeks.



  • Episode 32: Quentin Crisp Duck Face

    20 June 2015 (9:51pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 34 minutes and 38 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    We have a new Doctor, and a new release schedule. In the first weekly episode of Flight Through Entirety, Brendan, Nathan, Richard and Todd, the sort of girls who give motorcars pet names, discuss Tom Baker's first ever Doctor Who story, Robot. Please do not resist. We do not wish to cause you unnecessary pain.

    Buy the story!

    Robot was released on DVD in 2007. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Terrance Dicks's novelisation, Doctor Who and the Giant Robot, is available as an audiobook, read by Tom Baker. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Links and notes

    Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) has an emotional artificial person with a complex relationship with his creator. Coincidence?

    Pearl White played the eponymous heroine in the 1914 film serial The Perils of Pauline. Apparently she never got tied to the railway tracks though.

    Fans of terribly judgemental robots will enjoy Gort from George Pal's The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951).

    Anyone appalled by Richard's gingerphobia will perhaps be mollified by this video depicting Catherine Tate's admission to the Ginger Hair Safe House.

    If, like me, you're disappointed that Miss Bassey won't be singing the theme to the next Bond film, SPECTRE, you can console yourself by remembering the valiant It's Got To Be Bassey campaign. Bless you, boys.

    Some moments in this story are reminiscent of Terrance Dicks and Malcolm Hulke's second-season Avengers episode The Mauritius Penny, which exists on YouTube in its, er, entirety.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is just someone who loves life. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll just keep nagging you about it every episode for the next few weeks.



  • Episode 31: One Knee Up For Pertwee

    13 June 2015 (10:56pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 48 minutes and 12 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In yet another Very Special Episode, Todd joins Brendan, Richard and Nathan for a retrospective of the Pertwee Era. Liz, Jo or Sarah? Peladon, Spiridon or Exxilon? And, the most important question of all, which 70s sitcom would have been most improved if they'd only had the foresight to cast our very own Richard Stone?

    Linx

    We mention, with frank admiration, two novels by David McIntee: a Virgin Missing Adventure, The Dark Path, featuring the Second Doctor, Jamie, Victoria and the Master, as well as a BBC Past Doctor Adventure, The Face of the Enemy, in which, while the Doctor and Jo are visiting Peladon, the UNIT team join up with Barbara and Ian to fight the Master.

    Mark Gatiss reads the novelisation of Planet of the Daleks. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Birds of Prey (2002) was a short-lived American TV series in which three female superheroes join with Batman's butler to fight metahuman crime in New Gotham City. Which sounds fantastic, but isn't, apparently.

    There's no need for you to watch Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal in Love Story (1970) now that Richard has given away the ending.

    The Queen Spider pays a pivotal role in the appalling 2002 South Park episode Red Hot Catholic Love. She sounds like Eric Cartman doing an impression of the Great One: take a look.

    Meanwhile, on the French and Saunders Shopping Channel, delightful demi-precious diamonique jewellery is selling like hot cakes!

    Lis Sladen reads the novelisation of Planet of the Spiders. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    The sweet but awkward Lt Barclay makes the members of the Star Trek: The Next Generation crew look like horrible, horrible people in the Season 3 episode Hollow Pursuits.

    Geoffrey Beevers reads the novelisation of Colony in Space, Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Fans of the very worst things imaginable will enjoy the robot dog from Battlestar Galactica (1978), which is, alarmingly, played by a chimp in a suit. You can read the appalling history of this character here.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is simply nowhere to be found. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or a long-shanked rascal with a mighty nose will come round to your house and eat every last one of your sandwiches.



  • One Knee Up For Pertwee

    13 June 2015 (10:56pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 48 minutes and 13 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In yet another Very Special Episode, Todd joins Brendan, Richard and Nathan for a retrospective of the Pertwee Era. Liz, Jo or Sarah? Peladon, Spiridon or Exxilon? And, the most important question of all, which 70s sitcom would have been most improved if they'd only had the foresight to cast our very own Richard Stone?

    Linx

    We mention, with frank admiration, two novels by David McIntee: a Virgin Missing Adventure, [The Dark Path](http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/The_Dark_Path_(novel)), featuring the Second Doctor, Jamie, Victoria and the Master, as well as a BBC Past Doctor Adventure, [The Face of the Enemy](http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/The_Face_of_the_Enemy_(novel)), in which, while the Doctor and Jo are visiting Peladon, the UNIT team join up with Barbara and Ian to fight the Master.

    Mark Gatiss reads the novelisation of Planet of the Daleks. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Birds of Prey (2002) was a short-lived American TV series in which three female superheroes join with Batman's butler to fight metahuman crime in New Gotham City. Which sounds fantastic, but isn't, apparently.

    There's no need for you to watch Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal in Love Story (1970) now that Richard has given away the ending.

    The Queen Spider pays a pivotal role in the appalling 2002 South Park episode Red Hot Catholic Love. She sounds like Eric Cartman doing an impression of the Great One: take a look.

    Meanwhile, on the French and Saunders Shopping Channel, delightful demi-precious diamonique jewellery is selling like hot cakes!

    Lis Sladen reads the novelisation of Planet of the Spiders. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    The sweet but awkward Lt Barclay makes the members of the Star Trek: The Next Generation crew look like horrible, horrible people in the Season 3 episode [Hollow Pursuits](http://en.memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Hollow_Pursuits_(episode)).

    Geoffrey Beevers reads the novelisation of Colony in Space, Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Fans of the very worst things imaginable will enjoy the robot dog from Battlestar Galactica (1978), which is, alarmingly, played by a chimp in a suit. You can read the appalling history of this character here.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is simply nowhere to be found. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or a long-shanked rascal with a mighty nose will come round to your house and eat every last one of your sandwiches.



  • Episode 31 One Knee Up For Pertwee

    13 June 2015 (10:56pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 48 minutes and 13 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In yet another Very Special Episode, Todd joins Brendan, Richard and Nathan for a retrospective of the Pertwee Era. Liz, Jo or Sarah? Peladon, Spiridon or Exxilon? And, the most important question of all, which 70s sitcom would have been most improved if they'd only had the foresight to cast our very own Richard Stone?

    Linx

    We mention, with frank admiration, two novels by David McIntee: a Virgin Missing Adventure, [The Dark Path](http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/The_Dark_Path_(novel)), featuring the Second Doctor, Jamie, Victoria and the Master, as well as a BBC Past Doctor Adventure, [The Face of the Enemy](http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/The_Face_of_the_Enemy_(novel)), in which, while the Doctor and Jo are visiting Peladon, the UNIT team join up with Barbara and Ian to fight the Master.

    Mark Gatiss reads the novelisation of Planet of the Daleks. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Birds of Prey (2002) was a short-lived American TV series in which three female superheroes join with Batman's butler to fight metahuman crime in New Gotham City. Which sounds fantastic, but isn't, apparently.

    There's no need for you to watch Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal in Love Story (1970) now that Richard has given away the ending.

    The Queen Spider pays a pivotal role in the appalling 2002 South Park episode Red Hot Catholic Love. She sounds like Eric Cartman doing an impression of the Great One: take a look.

    Meanwhile, on the French and Saunders Shopping Channel, delightful demi-precious diamonique jewellery is selling like hot cakes!

    Lis Sladen reads the novelisation of Planet of the Spiders. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    The sweet but awkward Lt Barclay makes the members of the Star Trek: The Next Generation crew look like horrible, horrible people in the Season 3 episode [Hollow Pursuits](http://en.memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Hollow_Pursuits_(episode)).

    Geoffrey Beevers reads the novelisation of Colony in Space, Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Fans of the very worst things imaginable will enjoy the robot dog from Battlestar Galactica (1978), which is, alarmingly, played by a chimp in a suit. You can read the appalling history of this character here.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is simply nowhere to be found. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or a long-shanked rascal with a mighty nose will come round to your house and eat every last one of your sandwiches.



  • Episode 30: Evil Buddhists

    30 May 2015 (11:31pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 30 minutes and 59 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In an alternately languid and lachrymose episode of Flight Through Entirety, Brendan, Richard and Nathan spend a hilarious 30 minutes moaning about The Monster of Peladon, before farewelling Jon Pertwee's Doctor in Planet of the Spiders. Tears, Sarah Jane? Of course they are!

    Buy the stories!

    If, after everything we've just said, you want to revisit The Monster of Peladon, you'll be delighted to learn that it was released as part of the box set Peladon Tales in the UK and Australia, and on its own in the US. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Planet of the Spiders was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Monster of Peladon

    Well, we were too busy trashing the story to make any references to anything very much. Richard brings up ITC Entertainment, which was actually making good television at the time, but we've talked about it before. So why not enjoy Sue Perryman's take on the story from the Wife in Space blog? She gives it 2 out of 10, which is sweet of her.

    Oh, okay, and here's a lovely picture of Vega Nexos. Check out that back hair!

    Planet of the Spiders

    Fans of the way Jon Pertwee shamelessly plagiarises things will enjoy the Buddha's Flower Sermon again.

    Here's Jenny Laird's obituary in the Guardian, from November 2001. A huge loss to the acting profession, apparently.

    Gareth Hunt played Mike Gambit in The New Avengers in 1976-1977, while the role of Steed was played by Patrick Macnee in a corset.

    Jon Pertwee's final memoir I am the Doctor! was published postumously in 1996. It's out of print, but still available for fabulous amounts of money. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Whodunnit? was a 1970s panel game show thing, which ran on for six seasons on ITV. A murder mystery was acted out, and the celebrity panellists would have to work the identity of the murderer. Jon Pertwee took over from Edward Woodward as compere at the start of the second season. You can get a taste of it from this clip on YouTube. The first five seasons have also been released on DVD.

    Picks of the Week Nathan

    In the Trust Your Doctor podcast, Dylan and Kiyan work their way through every episode of Doctor Who, which sounds like an excellent idea for a podcast. Here's Brendan and Nathan's recent guest appearance, in which all four of us discuss Last of the Gaderene by Mark Gatiss.

    Brendan

    In the 1990s, BBC Radio released two new audio stories, written by Barry Letts and starring Jon Pertwee, Elisabeth Sladen and Nick Courtney. There were The Paradise of Death and The Ghosts of N-Space, both of which are available on iTunes.

    Richard

    In 1971, ITC released Jason King, starring Planet of Fire's Peter Wyngarde as the dashing and indescribably ugly Jason. Buy it on DVD! (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, and Richard is currently still a meatspace exclusive. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast, while The Trust Your Doctor podcast is on Twitter as @TYDpocast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or I'll come round to your house and draw a picture of a little girl on one of the pages of your favourite Ladybird book.



  • Episode 30 Evil Buddhists

    30 May 2015 (11:31pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 31 minutes and 0 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In an alternately languid and lachrymose episode of Flight Through Entirety, Brendan, Richard and Nathan spend a hilarious 30 minutes moaning about The Monster of Peladon, before farewelling Jon Pertwee's Doctor in Planet of the Spiders. Tears, Sarah Jane? Of course they are!

    Buy the stories!

    If, after everything we've just said, you want to revisit The Monster of Peladon, you'll be delighted to learn that it was released as part of the box set Peladon Tales in the UK and Australia, and on its own in the US. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Planet of the Spiders was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Monster of Peladon

    Well, we were too busy trashing the story to make any references to anything very much. Richard brings up ITC Entertainment, which was actually making good television at the time, but we've talked about it before. So why not enjoy Sue Perryman's take on the story from the Wife in Space blog? She gives it 2 out of 10, which is sweet of her.

    Oh, okay, and here's a lovely picture of Vega Nexos. Check out that back hair!

    Planet of the Spiders

    Fans of the way Jon Pertwee shamelessly plagiarises things will enjoy the Buddha's Flower Sermon again.

    Here's Jenny Laird's obituary in the Guardian, from November 2001. A huge loss to the acting profession, apparently.

    Gareth Hunt played Mike Gambit in The New Avengers in 1976-1977, while the role of Steed was played by Patrick Macnee in a corset.

    Jon Pertwee's final memoir I am the Doctor! was published postumously in 1996. It's out of print, but still available for fabulous amounts of money. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Whodunnit? was a 1970s panel game show thing, which ran on for six seasons on ITV. A murder mystery was acted out, and the celebrity panellists would have to work the identity of the murderer. Jon Pertwee took over from Edward Woodward as compere at the start of the second season. You can get a taste of it from this clip on YouTube. The first five seasons have also been released on DVD.

    Picks of the Week Nathan

    In the Trust Your Doctor podcast, Dylan and Kiyan work their way through every episode of Doctor Who, which sounds like an excellent idea for a podcast. Here's Brendan and Nathan's recent guest appearance, in which all four of us discuss [Last of the Gaderene](http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/Last_of_the_Gaderene_(novel)) by Mark Gatiss.

    Brendan

    In the 1990s, BBC Radio released two new audio stories, written by Barry Letts and starring Jon Pertwee, Elisabeth Sladen and Nick Courtney. There were The Paradise of Death and The Ghosts of N-Space, both of which are available on iTunes.

    Richard

    In 1971, ITC released Jason King, starring Planet of Fire's Peter Wyngarde as the dashing and indescribably ugly Jason. Buy it on DVD! (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, and Richard is currently still a meatspace exclusive. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast, while The Trust Your Doctor podcast is on Twitter as @TYDpocast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or I'll come round to your house and draw a picture of a little girl on one of the pages of your favourite Ladybird book.



  • Evil Buddhists

    30 May 2015 (11:31pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 31 minutes and 0 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In an alternately languid and lachrymose episode of Flight Through Entirety, Brendan, Richard and Nathan spend a hilarious 30 minutes moaning about The Monster of Peladon, before farewelling Jon Pertwee's Doctor in Planet of the Spiders. Tears, Sarah Jane? Of course they are!

    Buy the stories!

    If, after everything we've just said, you want to revisit The Monster of Peladon, you'll be delighted to learn that it was released as part of the box set Peladon Tales in the UK and Australia, and on its own in the US. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Planet of the Spiders was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Monster of Peladon

    Well, we were too busy trashing the story to make any references to anything very much. Richard brings up ITC Entertainment, which was actually making good television at the time, but we've talked about it before. So why not enjoy Sue Perryman's take on the story from the Wife in Space blog? She gives it 2 out of 10, which is sweet of her.

    Oh, okay, and here's a lovely picture of Vega Nexos. Check out that back hair!

    Planet of the Spiders

    Fans of the way Jon Pertwee shamelessly plagiarises things will enjoy the Buddha's Flower Sermon again.

    Here's Jenny Laird's obituary in the Guardian, from November 2001. A huge loss to the acting profession, apparently.

    Gareth Hunt played Mike Gambit in The New Avengers in 1976-1977, while the role of Steed was played by Patrick Macnee in a corset.

    Jon Pertwee's final memoir I am the Doctor! was published postumously in 1996. It's out of print, but still available for fabulous amounts of money. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Whodunnit? was a 1970s panel game show thing, which ran on for six seasons on ITV. A murder mystery was acted out, and the celebrity panellists would have to work the identity of the murderer. Jon Pertwee took over from Edward Woodward as compere at the start of the second season. You can get a taste of it from this clip on YouTube. The first five seasons have also been released on DVD.

    Picks of the Week Nathan

    In the Trust Your Doctor podcast, Dylan and Kiyan work their way through every episode of Doctor Who, which sounds like an excellent idea for a podcast. Here's Brendan and Nathan's recent guest appearance, in which all four of us discuss [Last of the Gaderene](http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/Last_of_the_Gaderene_(novel)) by Mark Gatiss.

    Brendan

    In the 1990s, BBC Radio released two new audio stories, written by Barry Letts and starring Jon Pertwee, Elisabeth Sladen and Nick Courtney. There were The Paradise of Death and The Ghosts of N-Space, both of which are available on iTunes.

    Richard

    In 1971, ITC released Jason King, starring Planet of Fire's Peter Wyngarde as the dashing and indescribably ugly Jason. Buy it on DVD! (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, and Richard is currently still a meatspace exclusive. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast, while The Trust Your Doctor podcast is on Twitter as @TYDpocast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or I'll come round to your house and draw a picture of a little girl on one of the pages of your favourite Ladybird book.



  • Episode 29 Sand in Your Parrinium

    19 May 2015 (5:32am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 49 minutes and 9 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    So, we've changed the desktop theme, and we're ready to start on the delightful Jon Pertwee's final year on Doctor Who, as we discuss the first three stories of Season 11: The Time Warrior, Invasion of the Dinosaurs and Death to the Daleks. Oh, beshrew me, but I grow fond of this fellow!

    Buy the stories!

    The Time Warrior was released on DVD in 2007/2008, including an option to watch a version of the story with acceptable special effects. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Invasion of the Dinosaurs, sadly, has no such option. It was released as part of the UNIT Files box set in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    And finally, Death to the Daleks was released on DVD in 2012. So there's that. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Time Warrior

    Mark Gatiss and Katy Manning are among the contributors to the BBC Radio 4 documentary Black Aquarius, which discusses the wave of interest in the occult which washed over British popular culture in the 1970s. Or if that's no longer available, fans of the 1970s might enjoy Cilla Black singing Aquarius instead.

    I searched and searched for the interview with Peter Cushing posted on our Facebook page by friend-of-the-podcast John Edwards Davies. But I couldn't find it. In the meantime, here's Peter Cushing being interviewed about the Hammer Horror films by Terry Wogan in 1988.

    Brendan mentions John Dorney's audio drama Special Features, which is a single-episode story released by Big Finish as part of The Demons of Red Lodge and Other Stories.

    Moonbase 3 was a BBC science-fiction series designed to be Terrance Dicks and Barry Letts's escape route from Doctor Who. Dr Philip Sandifer is less than impressed with it.

    Like Linx, Eddie Izzard is aware of the importance of having a flag when conquering new territories.

    Invasion of the Dinosaurs

    Here's Barry Letts hating on the dinosaurs from Invasion of the Dinosaurs.

    I wish I could find John Molyneux's video of dinosaurs snogging to the tune of Je t'aime, but just I can't. I remember seeing it in the 90s, and it was superb. Anyone who knows where it is, please, please, let me know the URL and I promise I'll post it.

    Here's a hilarious (and somewhat racist) taste of the Disney classic One of Our Dinosaurs is Missing (1975), starring, oh, okay, featuring television's Jon Pertwee.

    Fans of truly terrible things will enjoy this clip from Blue Peter in 1974, featuring the Whomobile, Jon Pertwee and Peter Purvis.

    The novelisation of this story is called The Dinosaur Invasion, and it's brilliant. It was originally released in 1976 with a fab pop-art cover by Chris Achilleos, and then it was re-released in 1978 with a more conventional cover by Jeff Cummins. You can compare the two here. The audiobook is read by Martin Jarvis, and it's great as well. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Death to the Daleks

    We discussed Erich Von Daniken's crazy Chariots of the Gods? a few episodes back. This story, with its tales of Exxilon astronauts building pyramids in Peru, is not the last time that this book will be relevant.

    Fans of romping adventure romps will enjoy She, by H. Rider Haggard, first published in 1886. Fans of Ursula Andress will enjoy the film version starring Ursula Andress, first released in 1965.

    Nathan was right. Famously terrible British novelist Edward Bulwer-Lytton was responsible for the opening line "It was a dark and stormy night". Fans of terrible opening lines will enjoy the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest. Fans of somewhat shorter opening lines will enjoy Adam Cadre's Little Lytton Contest.

    And here's some more exuberant crossplay from Brendan. SEE Bonnie Langford seeing Brendan dressed as Bonnie Langford!

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, and Richard is angry about Twitter and just wishes you kids would get off his lawn. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast, while The Trust Your Doctor podcast is on Twitter as @TYDpocast. Bless them.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. Or Linx will come around to your house and criticise the construction of your thorax.



  • Sand in Your Parrinium

    19 May 2015 (5:32am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 49 minutes and 9 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    So, we've changed the desktop theme, and we're ready to start on the delightful Jon Pertwee's final year on Doctor Who, as we discuss the first three stories of Season 11: The Time Warrior, Invasion of the Dinosaurs and Death to the Daleks. Oh, beshrew me, but I grow fond of this fellow!

    Buy the stories!

    The Time Warrior was released on DVD in 2007/2008, including an option to watch a version of the story with acceptable special effects. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Invasion of the Dinosaurs, sadly, has no such option. It was released as part of the UNIT Files box set in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    And finally, Death to the Daleks was released on DVD in 2012. So there's that. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Time Warrior

    Mark Gatiss and Katy Manning are among the contributors to the BBC Radio 4 documentary Black Aquarius, which discusses the wave of interest in the occult which washed over British popular culture in the 1970s. Or if that's no longer available, fans of the 1970s might enjoy Cilla Black singing Aquarius instead.

    I searched and searched for the interview with Peter Cushing posted on our Facebook page by friend-of-the-podcast John Edwards Davies. But I couldn't find it. In the meantime, here's Peter Cushing being interviewed about the Hammer Horror films by Terry Wogan in 1988.

    Brendan mentions John Dorney's audio drama Special Features, which is a single-episode story released by Big Finish as part of The Demons of Red Lodge and Other Stories.

    Moonbase 3 was a BBC science-fiction series designed to be Terrance Dicks and Barry Letts's escape route from Doctor Who. Dr Elizabeth Sandifer is less than impressed with it.

    Like Linx, Eddie Izzard is aware of the importance of having a flag when conquering new territories.

    Invasion of the Dinosaurs

    Here's Barry Letts hating on the dinosaurs from Invasion of the Dinosaurs.

    I wish I could find John Molyneux's video of dinosaurs snogging to the tune of Je t'aime, but just I can't. I remember seeing it in the 90s, and it was superb. Anyone who knows where it is, please, please, let me know the URL and I promise I'll post it.

    Here's a hilarious (and somewhat racist) taste of the Disney classic One of Our Dinosaurs is Missing (1975), starring, oh, okay, featuring television's Jon Pertwee.

    Fans of truly terrible things will enjoy this clip from Blue Peter in 1974, featuring the Whomobile, Jon Pertwee and Peter Purvis.

    The novelisation of this story is called The Dinosaur Invasion, and it's brilliant. It was originally released in 1976 with a fab pop-art cover by Chris Achilleos, and then it was re-released in 1978 with a more conventional cover by Jeff Cummins. You can compare the two here. The audiobook is read by Martin Jarvis, and it's great as well. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Death to the Daleks

    We discussed Erich Von Daniken's crazy Chariots of the Gods? a few episodes back. This story, with its tales of Exxilon astronauts building pyramids in Peru, is not the last time that this book will be relevant.

    Fans of romping adventure romps will enjoy She, by H. Rider Haggard, first published in 1886. Fans of Ursula Andress will enjoy the film version starring Ursula Andress, first released in 1965.

    Nathan was right. Famously terrible British novelist Edward Bulwer-Lytton was responsible for the opening line "It was a dark and stormy night". Fans of terrible opening lines will enjoy the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest. Fans of somewhat shorter opening lines will enjoy Adam Cadre's Little Lytton Contest.

    And here's some more exuberant crossplay from Brendan. SEE Bonnie Langford seeing Brendan dressed as Bonnie Langford!

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, and Richard is angry about Twitter and just wishes you kids would get off his lawn. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast, while The Trust Your Doctor podcast is on Twitter as @TYDpocast. Bless them.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. Or Linx will come around to your house and criticise the construction of your thorax.



  • Episode 29: Sand in Your Parrinium

    19 May 2015 (5:32am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 49 minutes and 9 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    So, we've changed the desktop theme, and we're ready to start on the delightful Jon Pertwee's final year on Doctor Who, as we discuss the first three stories of Season 11: The Time Warrior, Invasion of the Dinosaurs and Death to the Daleks. Oh, beshrew me, but I grow fond of this fellow!

    Buy the stories!

    The Time Warrior was released on DVD in 2007/2008, including an option to watch a version of the story with acceptable special effects. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Invasion of the Dinosaurs, sadly, has no such option. It was released as part of the UNIT Files box set in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    And finally, Death to the Daleks was released on DVD in 2012. So there's that. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Time Warrior

    Mark Gatiss and Katy Manning are among the contributors to the BBC Radio 4 documentary Black Aquarius, which discusses the wave of interest in the occult which washed over British popular culture in the 1970s. Or if that's no longer available, fans of the 1970s might enjoy Cilla Black singing Aquarius instead.

    I searched and searched for the interview with Peter Cushing posted on our Facebook page by friend-of-the-podcast John Edwards Davies. But I couldn't find it. In the meantime, here's Peter Cushing being interviewed about the Hammer Horror films by Terry Wogan in 1988.

    Brendan mentions John Dorney's audio drama Special Features, which is a single-episode story released by Big Finish as part of The Demons of Red Lodge and Other Stories.

    Moonbase 3 was a BBC science-fiction series designed to be Terrance Dicks and Barry Letts's escape route from Doctor Who. Dr Philip Sandifer is less than impressed with it.

    Like Linx, Eddie Izzard is aware of the importance of having a flag when conquering new territories.

    Invasion of the Dinosaurs

    Here's Barry Letts hating on the dinosaurs from Invasion of the Dinosaurs.

    I wish I could find John Molyneux's video of dinosaurs snogging to the tune of Je t'aime, but just I can't. I remember seeing it in the 90s, and it was superb. Anyone who knows where it is, please, please, let me know the URL and I promise I'll post it.

    Here's a hilarious (and somewhat racist) taste of the Disney classic One of Our Dinosaurs is Missing (1975), starring, oh, okay, featuring television's Jon Pertwee.

    Fans of truly terrible things will enjoy this clip from Blue Peter in 1974, featuring the Whomobile, Jon Pertwee and Peter Purvis.

    The novelisation of this story is called The Dinosaur Invasion, and it's brilliant. It was originally released in 1976 with a fab pop-art cover by Chris Achilleos, and then it was re-released in 1978 with a more conventional cover by Jeff Cummins. You can compare the two here. The audiobook is read by Martin Jarvis, and it's great as well. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Death to the Daleks

    We discussed Erich Von Daniken's crazy Chariots of the Gods? a few episodes back. This story, with its tales of Exxilon astronauts building pyramids in Peru, is not the last time that this book will be relevant.

    Fans of romping adventure romps will enjoy She, by H. Rider Haggard, first published in 1886. Fans of Ursula Andress will enjoy the film version starring Ursula Andress, first released in 1965.

    Nathan was right. Famously terrible British novelist Edward Bulwer-Lytton was responsible for the opening line "It was a dark and stormy night". Fans of terrible opening lines will enjoy the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest. Fans of somewhat shorter opening lines will enjoy Adam Cadre's Little Lytton Contest.

    And here's some more exuberant crossplay from Brendan. SEE Bonnie Langford seeing Brendan dressed as Bonnie Langford!

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, and Richard is angry about Twitter and just wishes you kids would get off his lawn. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast, while The Trust Your Doctor podcast is on Twitter as @TYDpocast. Bless them.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. Or Linx will come around to your house and criticise the construction of your thorax.



  • Episode 28: You're Not Katharine Hepburn

    25 April 2015 (11:52pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 44 minutes and 48 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In a heartbreaking series finale, Brendan, Todd and Nathan say goodbye to Katy Manning, as we discuss naked aliens, two-syllable names, dog-headed maggots and patronising the Welsh. That's right: it's Planet of the Daleks and The Green Death. Goodbye, Jo. You were fantastic.

    Buy the stories!

    Planet of the Daleks was released in 2009/2010 as part of the Dalek War box set. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Green Death: Special Edition was released on DVD in (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Planet of the Daleks

    Mark Gatiss gets to read his very favourite Target novelisation, Terrance Dicks's Doctor Who and the Planet of the Daleks. Which is nice. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    David Graham was once of the original Daleks way back in 1964. In 2015, at the age of 88, he reprises his role as Lady Penelope's chauffer Parker in Thunderbirds Are Go. You can see the trailer for it here.

    The Seventh Doctor returns to deal with the frozen Dalek army in the Big Finish audio Return of the Daleks.

    Brendan mentions a very rude re-edit of Jon Pertwee reading the Planet of the Daleks novelisation. It's by the Doctor Who Breastoration Team, so you've been warned.

    And here's a comparison of the 1976 cover of Terrance Dicks's novelisation and Clayton Hickman's loving tribute to it for the 2009 DVD release.

    The Green Death

    Rachael Carson's 1962 novel Silent Spring talks about the damage caused to the environment by the use of pesticides. We talked about it when we discussed Planet of the Giants, oh, so long ago. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The giant flying bird feet on Metebelis 3 reminds Brendan of the worst monster fight ever in a Godzilla movie. Watch it: it makes Planet of the Dinosaurs look like Jurassic Park III.

    Harry Mudd and Captain Kirk explode an android's brain using the Liar's Paradox in the 1967 Star Trek episode I, Mudd.

    And, of course, here's Peter Cushing Lives in Whitstable by the Jellybottys.

    Picks of the Week Todd

    Todd picked the Sarah Jane Adventures season 4 serial The Death of the Doctor. It's a DVD extra on The Green Death: Special Edition, so you might already have a copy without even realising it!

    Brendan

    The Big Finish Companion Chronicle Find and Replace, features Katy Manning playing both a future Jo Grant and the inimitable Iris Wildthyme.

    Nathan

    In 2015, Russell T Davies had three linked shows on Channel 4 in the UK: Cucumber, Banana and Tofu. Cucumber follows the story of Henry Best, a 46-year-old gay man living in Manchester, Banana is an anthology show, mostly featuring younger queer characters from Cucumber, and Tofu consists of actors from the other two shows and ordinary people discussing issues of sex and sexuality.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We just love it when you say lovely things about us.



  • Episode 28 You're Not Katharine Hepburn

    25 April 2015 (11:52pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 44 minutes and 49 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In a heartbreaking series finale, Brendan, Todd and Nathan say goodbye to Katy Manning, as we discuss naked aliens, two-syllable names, dog-headed maggots and patronising the Welsh. That's right: it's Planet of the Daleks and The Green Death. Goodbye, Jo. You were fantastic.

    Buy the stories!

    Planet of the Daleks was released in 2009/2010 as part of the Dalek War box set. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Green Death: Special Edition was released on DVD in (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Planet of the Daleks

    Mark Gatiss gets to read his very favourite Target novelisation, Terrance Dicks's Doctor Who and the Planet of the Daleks. Which is nice. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    David Graham was once of the original Daleks way back in 1964. In 2015, at the age of 88, he reprises his role as Lady Penelope's chauffer Parker in Thunderbirds Are Go. You can see the trailer for it here.

    The Seventh Doctor returns to deal with the frozen Dalek army in the Big Finish audio Return of the Daleks.

    Brendan mentions a very rude re-edit of Jon Pertwee reading the Planet of the Daleks novelisation. It's by the Doctor Who Breastoration Team, so you've been warned.

    And here's a comparison of the 1976 cover of Terrance Dicks's novelisation and Clayton Hickman's loving tribute to it for the 2009 DVD release.

    The Green Death

    Rachael Carson's 1962 novel Silent Spring talks about the damage caused to the environment by the use of pesticides. We talked about it when we discussed Planet of the Giants, oh, so long ago. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The giant flying bird feet on Metebelis 3 reminds Brendan of the worst monster fight ever in a Godzilla movie. Watch it: it makes Planet of the Dinosaurs look like Jurassic Park III.

    Harry Mudd and Captain Kirk explode an android's brain using the Liar's Paradox in the 1967 Star Trek episode I, Mudd.

    And, of course, here's Peter Cushing Lives in Whitstable by the Jellybottys.

    Picks of the Week Todd

    Todd picked the Sarah Jane Adventures season 4 serial The Death of the Doctor. It's a DVD extra on The Green Death: Special Edition, so you might already have a copy without even realising it!

    Brendan

    The Big Finish Companion Chronicle Find and Replace, features Katy Manning playing both a future Jo Grant and the inimitable Iris Wildthyme.

    Nathan

    In 2015, Russell T Davies had three linked shows on Channel 4 in the UK: Cucumber, Banana and Tofu. Cucumber follows the story of Henry Best, a 46-year-old gay man living in Manchester, Banana is an anthology show, mostly featuring younger queer characters from Cucumber, and Tofu consists of actors from the other two shows and ordinary people discussing issues of sex and sexuality.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We just love it when you say lovely things about us.



  • You're Not Katharine Hepburn

    25 April 2015 (11:52pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 44 minutes and 49 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In a heartbreaking series finale, Brendan, Todd and Nathan say goodbye to Katy Manning, as we discuss naked aliens, two-syllable names, dog-headed maggots and patronising the Welsh. That's right: it's Planet of the Daleks and The Green Death. Goodbye, Jo. You were fantastic.

    Buy the stories!

    Planet of the Daleks was released in 2009/2010 as part of the Dalek War box set. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Green Death: Special Edition was released on DVD in (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Planet of the Daleks

    Mark Gatiss gets to read his very favourite Target novelisation, Terrance Dicks's Doctor Who and the Planet of the Daleks. Which is nice. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    David Graham was once of the original Daleks way back in 1964. In 2015, at the age of 88, he reprises his role as Lady Penelope's chauffer Parker in Thunderbirds Are Go. You can see the trailer for it here.

    The Seventh Doctor returns to deal with the frozen Dalek army in the Big Finish audio Return of the Daleks.

    Brendan mentions a very rude re-edit of Jon Pertwee reading the Planet of the Daleks novelisation. It's by the Doctor Who Breastoration Team, so you've been warned.

    And here's a comparison of the 1976 cover of Terrance Dicks's novelisation and Clayton Hickman's loving tribute to it for the 2009 DVD release.

    The Green Death

    Rachael Carson's 1962 novel Silent Spring talks about the damage caused to the environment by the use of pesticides. We talked about it when we discussed Planet of the Giants, oh, so long ago. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The giant flying bird feet on Metebelis 3 reminds Brendan of the worst monster fight ever in a Godzilla movie. Watch it: it makes Planet of the Dinosaurs look like Jurassic Park III.

    Harry Mudd and Captain Kirk explode an android's brain using the Liar's Paradox in the 1967 Star Trek episode I, Mudd.

    And, of course, here's Peter Cushing Lives in Whitstable by the Jellybottys.

    Picks of the Week Todd

    Todd picked the Sarah Jane Adventures season 4 serial The Death of the Doctor. It's a DVD extra on The Green Death: Special Edition, so you might already have a copy without even realising it!

    Brendan

    The Big Finish Companion Chronicle Find and Replace, features Katy Manning playing both a future Jo Grant and the inimitable Iris Wildthyme.

    Nathan

    In 2015, Russell T Davies had three linked shows on Channel 4 in the UK: Cucumber, Banana and Tofu. Cucumber follows the story of Henry Best, a 46-year-old gay man living in Manchester, Banana is an anthology show, mostly featuring younger queer characters from Cucumber, and Tofu consists of actors from the other two shows and ordinary people discussing issues of sex and sexuality.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We just love it when you say lovely things about us.



  • Bessie Doesn't Say Very Much

    12 April 2015 (3:04am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes and 18 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's the Doctor's tenth birthday, but we get the presents, as we discuss non-existent Time Lord heroes, the inestimable Cheryl Hall, and large and savage reptiles in The Three Doctors, Carnival of Monsters and Frontier in Space. Thank you Miss Grant, we'll let you know!

    Buy the stories!

    The Three Doctors was released as a Special Edition in 2012 -- by itself in the US (Amazon US), and as part of the Revisitations 3 box set in the UK and Australia (Amazon UK).

    Similarly, Carnival of Monsters was released in 2012 -- by itself in the US (Amazon US), and as part of the Revisitations 2 box set in the UK and Australia (Amazon UK).

    Frontier in Space was released in 2009/2010 as part of the Dalek War box set. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Three Doctors

    Guy Crayford, from The Android Invasion, is famous for never looking under his eyepatch to discover that his eye isn't actually missing. Is he as careless about his personal appearance as Omega is?

    The Gell Guards look like a slightly more cuddly version of Sigmund the Sea Monster, a horrifying Saturday morning TV show from the 70s by the equally horrifying Sid and Marty Krofft.

    Fans of Chris Achilleos will be appalled by the similarities between his cover for the Three Doctors novelisation and the cover of Fantastic Four issue 49.

    The Fifth and the Tenth Doctor team up for the 2007 Children in Need special, Time Crash.

    Carnival of Monsters

    I think we've mentioned the Bechdel test before, as a back-of-the-envelope way of assessing the sexism of a film or TV show. Here's an analysis of how Doctor Who has stood up to the Bechdel test over the last 50 years or so.

    Fans of inexplicable time paradoxes that drive Todd crazy will enjoy the first Big Finish Paul McGann audio Storm Warning, which features the real-life doomed airship R101, and its only survivor, India Fisher's Charley Pollard.

    Frontier in Space

    Fans of the Hammond Organ will enjoy the Doctor Who theme: Delaware version.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We'd really appreciate your (gushingly positive) feedback!



  • Episode 27 Bessie Doesn't Say Very Much

    12 April 2015 (3:04am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes and 18 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's the Doctor's tenth birthday, but we get the presents, as we discuss non-existent Time Lord heroes, the inestimable Cheryl Hall, and large and savage reptiles in The Three Doctors, Carnival of Monsters and Frontier in Space. Thank you Miss Grant, we'll let you know!

    Buy the stories!

    The Three Doctors was released as a Special Edition in 2012 -- by itself in the US (Amazon US), and as part of the Revisitations 3 box set in the UK and Australia (Amazon UK).

    Similarly, Carnival of Monsters was released in 2012 -- by itself in the US (Amazon US), and as part of the Revisitations 2 box set in the UK and Australia (Amazon UK).

    Frontier in Space was released in 2009/2010 as part of the Dalek War box set. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Three Doctors

    Guy Crayford, from The Android Invasion, is famous for never looking under his eyepatch to discover that his eye isn't actually missing. Is he as careless about his personal appearance as Omega is?

    The Gell Guards look like a slightly more cuddly version of Sigmund the Sea Monster, a horrifying Saturday morning TV show from the 70s by the equally horrifying Sid and Marty Krofft.

    Fans of Chris Achilleos will be appalled by the similarities between his cover for the Three Doctors novelisation and the cover of Fantastic Four issue 49.

    The Fifth and the Tenth Doctor team up for the 2007 Children in Need special, Time Crash.

    Carnival of Monsters

    I think we've mentioned the Bechdel test before, as a back-of-the-envelope way of assessing the sexism of a film or TV show. Here's an analysis of how Doctor Who has stood up to the Bechdel test over the last 50 years or so.

    Fans of inexplicable time paradoxes that drive Todd crazy will enjoy the first Big Finish Paul McGann audio Storm Warning, which features the real-life doomed airship R101, and its only survivor, India Fisher's Charley Pollard.

    Frontier in Space

    Fans of the Hammond Organ will enjoy the Doctor Who theme: Delaware version.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We'd really appreciate your (gushingly positive) feedback!



  • Episode 27: Bessie Doesn't Say Very Much

    12 April 2015 (3:04am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes and 18 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's the Doctor's tenth birthday, but we get the presents, as we discuss non-existent Time Lord heroes, the inestimable Cheryl Hall, and large and savage reptiles in The Three Doctors, Carnival of Monsters and Frontier in Space. Thank you Miss Grant, we'll let you know!

    Buy the stories!

    The Three Doctors was released as a Special Edition in 2012 -- by itself in the US (Amazon US), and as part of the Revisitations 3 box set in the UK and Australia (Amazon UK).

    Similarly, Carnival of Monsters was released in 2012 -- by itself in the US (Amazon US), and as part of the Revisitations 2 box set in the UK and Australia (Amazon UK).

    Frontier in Space was released in 2009/2010 as part of the Dalek War box set. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Three Doctors

    Guy Crayford, from The Android Invasion, is famous for never looking under his eyepatch to discover that his eye isn't actually missing. Is he as careless about his personal appearance as Omega is?

    The Gell Guards look like a slightly more cuddly version of Sigmund the Sea Monster, a horrifying Saturday morning TV show from the 70s by the equally horrifying Sid and Marty Krofft.

    Fans of Chris Achilleos will be appalled by the similarities between his cover for the Three Doctors novelisation and the cover of Fantastic Four issue 49.

    The Fifth and the Tenth Doctor team up for the 2007 Children in Need special, Time Crash.

    Carnival of Monsters

    I think we've mentioned the Bechdel test before, as a back-of-the-envelope way of assessing the sexism of a film or TV show. Here's an analysis of how Doctor Who has stood up to the Bechdel test over the last 50 years or so.

    Fans of inexplicable time paradoxes that drive Todd crazy will enjoy the first Big Finish Paul McGann audio Storm Warning, which features the real-life doomed airship R101, and it's only survivor, India Fisher's Charley Pollard.

    Frontier in Space

    Fans of the Hammond Organ will enjoy the Doctor Who theme: Delaware version.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We'd really appreciate your (gushingly positive) feedback!



  • Episode 26: Flouncy Trouncy Bouncy Busty

    29 March 2015 (4:42am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 17 minutes and 34 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    And it's time for the end of Season 9 of Doctor Who, and so Brendan, Richard and Nathan explore the weighty themes of colonialism and utter nonsense, as we discuss The Mutants and The Time Monster. Simmer down, Stu!

    Buy the stories!

    The Mutants was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Time Monster was relesed in the US in 2010 (Amazon US). In the UK and Australia, it was only released as part of the Myths and Legends Box Set, which also includes the rightfully unloved Underworld and The Horns of Nimon, which I secretly quite like. Shut up. (Amazon UK)

    The Mutants

    The Marshal of Solos is eerily reminiscent of everyone's favourite wartime reactionary cartoon character, Colonel Blimp.

    We haven't mentioned this for a while, so I guess it's time for About Time by Tat Wood. His Pertwee volume is in its second edition, with heaps more information, and, sadly, heaps less Lawrence Miles. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of the glowy rainbow cave on Solos will also enjoy William Blake's watercolours. Fans of William Blake's watercolours will also enjoy Philip Sandifer's crazy Blakean review of The Three Doctors.

    The Time Lords' box is eerily reminiscent of Nathan and Richard's beloved childhood toy, the wonderfully-named Tupperware Shape-O-Ball.

    And, of course, the question on everyone's lips: Why didn't the Eagles just drop the One Ring into Mount Doom?

    The Time Monster

    In his conversation with Jo in episode 6, Pertwee shamelessly plagiarises the Buddha's Flower Sermon.

    Princess Peach becomes the hero in Super Princess Peach, overcoming her enemies with the power of her womanly emotions. Her tiresome habit of being kidnapped so that she can be rescued by Mario is deconstructed in Tropes vs Women in Video Games, Damsel in Distress (Part 1).

    Cat People (1942) is an early horror film directed by Jacques Tourneur. You can watch the scary stalking scene mentioned by Brendan here. You can watch the entire film here, and its sequel, The Curse of the Cat People (1944), here.

    Fans of the new TARDIS console room will enjoy redirecorating their houses with furtinure designs by Cappellini and Luigi Colani.

    Picks of the Week! Nathan

    Sandifer's final TARDIS Eruditorum entry on Silence in the Library takes the form of a 100,000 word history of Doctor Who. Brilliant.

    Richard

    The Curse of Peladon novelisation is out of print, and it's not available as an ebook either. (And why on Earth not?) However, the audiobook is available, narrated by David Troughton. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Brendan

    Reeltime Pictures has rebranded, and it is now selling its video back catalogue as Time Travel TV. Mythmakers #73, which is a 45-minute interview with Robert Sloman can be found here.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley. Richard is only available in real life. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We've got a couple of lovely reviews already, but more reviews will help people to find our podcast and will help us to achieve our ambitions of internet fame. So off you go!



  • Flouncy Trouncy Bouncy Busty

    29 March 2015 (4:42am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 17 minutes and 34 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    And it's time for the end of Season 9 of Doctor Who, and so Brendan, Richard and Nathan explore the weighty themes of colonialism and utter nonsense, as we discuss The Mutants and The Time Monster. Simmer down, Stu!

    Buy the stories!

    The Mutants was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Time Monster was relesed in the US in 2010 (Amazon US). In the UK and Australia, it was only released as part of the Myths and Legends Box Set, which also includes the rightfully unloved Underworld and The Horns of Nimon, which I secretly quite like. Shut up. (Amazon UK)

    The Mutants

    The Marshal of Solos is eerily reminiscent of everyone's favourite wartime reactionary cartoon character, Colonel Blimp.

    We haven't mentioned this for a while, so I guess it's time for About Time by Tat Wood. His Pertwee volume is in its second edition, with heaps more information, and, sadly, heaps less Lawrence Miles. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of the glowy rainbow cave on Solos will also enjoy William Blake's watercolours. Fans of William Blake's watercolours will also enjoy Elizabeth Sandifer's crazy Blakean review of The Three Doctors.

    The Time Lords' box is eerily reminiscent of Nathan and Richard's beloved childhood toy, the wonderfully-named Tupperware Shape-O-Ball.

    And, of course, the question on everyone's lips: Why didn't the Eagles just drop the One Ring into Mount Doom?

    The Time Monster

    In his conversation with Jo in episode 6, Pertwee shamelessly plagiarises the Buddha's Flower Sermon.

    Princess Peach becomes the hero in Super Princess Peach, overcoming her enemies with the power of her womanly emotions. Her tiresome habit of being kidnapped so that she can be rescued by Mario is deconstructed in Tropes vs Women in Video Games, Damsel in Distress (Part 1).

    Cat People (1942) is an early horror film directed by Jacques Tourneur. You can watch the scary stalking scene mentioned by Brendan here. You can watch the entire film here, and its sequel, The Curse of the Cat People (1944), here.

    Fans of the new TARDIS console room will enjoy redirecorating their houses with furtinure designs by Cappellini and Luigi Colani.

    Picks of the Week! Nathan

    Sandifer's final TARDIS Eruditorum entry on Silence in the Library takes the form of a 100,000 word history of Doctor Who. Brilliant.

    Richard

    The Curse of Peladon novelisation is out of print, and it's not available as an ebook either. (And why on Earth not?) However, the audiobook is available, narrated by David Troughton. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Brendan

    Reeltime Pictures has rebranded, and it is now selling its video back catalogue as Time Travel TV. Mythmakers #73, which is a 45-minute interview with Robert Sloman can be found here.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley. Richard is only available in real life. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We've got a couple of lovely reviews already, but more reviews will help people to find our podcast and will help us to achieve our ambitions of internet fame. So off you go!



  • Episode 26 Flouncy Trouncy Bouncy Busty

    29 March 2015 (4:42am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 17 minutes and 34 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    And it's time for the end of Season 9 of Doctor Who, and so Brendan, Richard and Nathan explore the weighty themes of colonialism and utter nonsense, as we discuss The Mutants and The Time Monster. Simmer down, Stu!

    Buy the stories!

    The Mutants was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Time Monster was relesed in the US in 2010 (Amazon US). In the UK and Australia, it was only released as part of the Myths and Legends Box Set, which also includes the rightfully unloved Underworld and The Horns of Nimon, which I secretly quite like. Shut up. (Amazon UK)

    The Mutants

    The Marshal of Solos is eerily reminiscent of everyone's favourite wartime reactionary cartoon character, Colonel Blimp.

    We haven't mentioned this for a while, so I guess it's time for About Time by Tat Wood. His Pertwee volume is in its second edition, with heaps more information, and, sadly, heaps less Lawrence Miles. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of the glowy rainbow cave on Solos will also enjoy William Blake's watercolours. Fans of William Blake's watercolours will also enjoy Philip Sandifer's crazy Blakean review of The Three Doctors.

    The Time Lords' box is eerily reminiscent of Nathan and Richard's beloved childhood toy, the wonderfully-named Tupperware Shape-O-Ball.

    And, of course, the question on everyone's lips: Why didn't the Eagles just drop the One Ring into Mount Doom?

    The Time Monster

    In his conversation with Jo in episode 6, Pertwee shamelessly plagiarises the Buddha's Flower Sermon.

    Princess Peach becomes the hero in Super Princess Peach, overcoming her enemies with the power of her womanly emotions. Her tiresome habit of being kidnapped so that she can be rescued by Mario is deconstructed in Tropes vs Women in Video Games, Damsel in Distress (Part 1).

    Cat People (1942) is an early horror film directed by Jacques Tourneur. You can watch the scary stalking scene mentioned by Brendan here. You can watch the entire film here, and its sequel, The Curse of the Cat People (1944), here.

    Fans of the new TARDIS console room will enjoy redirecorating their houses with furtinure designs by Cappellini and Luigi Colani.

    Picks of the Week! Nathan

    Sandifer's final TARDIS Eruditorum entry on Silence in the Library takes the form of a 100,000 word history of Doctor Who. Brilliant.

    Richard

    The Curse of Peladon novelisation is out of print, and it's not available as an ebook either. (And why on Earth not?) However, the audiobook is available, narrated by David Troughton. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Brendan

    Reeltime Pictures has rebranded, and it is now selling its video back catalogue as Time Travel TV. Mythmakers #73, which is a 45-minute interview with Robert Sloman can be found here.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley. Richard is only available in real life. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We've got a couple of lovely reviews already, but more reviews will help people to find our podcast and will help us to achieve our ambitions of internet fame. So off you go!



  • Episode 25: A Hessian Sack Full of Candy Canes

    15 March 2015 (1:13am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 0 minutes and 0 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's the start of Season 9, and so it's time for Brendan, Richard and Nathan to grow a terrorist moustache or stick on a military-issue UNIT one and settle back with a sardonic wine and a runny brie to watch Day of the Daleks, The Curse of Peladon and The Sea Devils. Oh, Centauri, stop it!

    Buy the stories!

    Day of the Daleks was released in 2011 as a Special Edition DVD, with an excitingly remastered version which we discuss in the episode. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    In the UK and Australia, The Curse of Peladon was released in 2010 as part of the decreasingly impressive Peladon Tales Boxset (Amazon UK). It was released separately in the US. (Amazon US)

    Again, in the UK and Australia, The Sea Devils was released in 2008 as part of the Beneath the Surface Boxset (Amazon UK). It was released separately in the US. (Amazon US)

    Day of the Daleks

    Once again, here are some photos of Brendan dressed as Katy Manning from Day of the Daleks.

    And there's that old Vulcan saying: Only Nixon could go to China.

    Earlier this month, Australian activist group Beyond Green responded to Attorney-General George Brandis's plan to save details about every Australian's online activity, by suggesting that we should CC him into every email conversation we have.

    (Not that) Louis Marx was responsible for a range of toy Daleks in the 1960s, some of which later found their way into the programme to represent armies of Daleks that the production could actually afford. (See, among others, Planet of the Daleks.)

    Here's Clayton Hickman's tweet about the poor condition of the Dalek props in Day of the Daleks.

    You won't want to miss Aubrey Woods singing The Candyman Can from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971).

    Brendan mentions Flight of the Darned, by farmageddon71, the person behind the 1990s special edition of The Five Doctors. No spoilers, but stop whatever you're doing right now and watch it immediately.

    Here's Sean Pertwee dressed up as his father dressed up as the Doctor for Halloween 2014.

    The Curse of Peladon

    The Radio Times review of The Curse of Peladon has a lovely publicity shot of Katy Manning complete with a stray hair roller. (Katy claims that these were actually shots from rehearsals rather than specially-staged publicity shots.)

    Arcturus, apparently, went on to have a prolific television career, starring as Bernard, part of Queen Asphyxia's triple husbandoid, in Blackadder's Christmas Carol.

    I am proud to announce that I have been unable to find all of Alpha Centauri's appearance on The Black and White Minstrel Show, although a brief clip can be seen here, as part of BabelColour's brilliant Every Doctor Who Story video.

    The Sea Devils

    Here are some lovely episodes of The Clangers for you to enjoy.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. Go on.



  • A Hessian Sack Full of Candy Canes

    15 March 2015 (1:13am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 44 minutes and 59 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's the start of Season 9, and so it's time for Brendan, Richard and Nathan to grow a terrorist moustache or stick on a military-issue UNIT one and settle back with a sardonic wine and a runny brie to watch Day of the Daleks, The Curse of Peladon and The Sea Devils. Oh, Centauri, stop it!

    Buy the stories!

    Day of the Daleks was released in 2011 as a Special Edition DVD, with an excitingly remastered version which we discuss in the episode. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    In the UK and Australia, The Curse of Peladon was released in 2010 as part of the decreasingly impressive Peladon Tales Boxset (Amazon UK). It was released separately in the US. (Amazon US)

    Again, in the UK and Australia, The Sea Devils was released in 2008 as part of the Beneath the Surface Boxset (Amazon UK). It was released separately in the US. (Amazon US)

    Day of the Daleks

    Once again, here are some photos of Brendan dressed as Katy Manning from Day of the Daleks.

    And there's that old Vulcan saying: Only Nixon could go to China.

    Earlier this month, Australian activist group Beyond Green responded to Attorney-General George Brandis's plan to save details about every Australian's online activity, by suggesting that we should CC him into every email conversation we have.

    (Not that) Louis Marx was responsible for a range of toy Daleks in the 1960s, some of which later found their way into the programme to represent armies of Daleks that the production could actually afford. (See, among others, Planet of the Daleks.)

    Here's Clayton Hickman's tweet about the poor condition of the Dalek props in Day of the Daleks.

    You won't want to miss Aubrey Woods singing The Candyman Can from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971).

    Brendan mentions Flight of the Darned, by farmageddon71, the person behind the 1990s special edition of The Five Doctors. No spoilers, but stop whatever you're doing right now and watch it immediately.

    Here's Sean Pertwee dressed up as his father dressed up as the Doctor for Halloween 2014.

    The Curse of Peladon

    The Radio Times review of The Curse of Peladon has a lovely publicity shot of Katy Manning complete with a stray hair roller. (Katy claims that these were actually shots from rehearsals rather than specially-staged publicity shots.)

    Arcturus, apparently, went on to have a prolific television career, starring as Bernard, part of Queen Asphyxia's triple husbandoid, in Blackadder's Christmas Carol.

    I am proud to announce that I have been unable to find all of Alpha Centauri's appearance on The Black and White Minstrel Show, although a brief clip can be seen here, as part of BabelColour's brilliant Every Doctor Who Story video.

    The Sea Devils

    Here are some lovely episodes of The Clangers for you to enjoy.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. Go on.



  • Episode 25 A Hessian Sack Full of Candy Canes

    15 March 2015 (1:13am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 44 minutes and 59 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's the start of Season 9, and so it's time for Brendan, Richard and Nathan to grow a terrorist moustache or stick on a military-issue UNIT one and settle back with a sardonic wine and a runny brie to watch Day of the Daleks, The Curse of Peladon and The Sea Devils. Oh, Centauri, stop it!

    Buy the stories!

    Day of the Daleks was released in 2011 as a Special Edition DVD, with an excitingly remastered version which we discuss in the episode. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    In the UK and Australia, The Curse of Peladon was released in 2010 as part of the decreasingly impressive Peladon Tales Boxset (Amazon UK). It was released separately in the US. (Amazon US)

    Again, in the UK and Australia, The Sea Devils was released in 2008 as part of the Beneath the Surface Boxset (Amazon UK). It was released separately in the US. (Amazon US)

    Day of the Daleks

    Once again, here are some photos of Brendan dressed as Katy Manning from Day of the Daleks.

    And there's that old Vulcan saying: Only Nixon could go to China.

    Earlier this month, Australian activist group Beyond Green responded to Attorney-General George Brandis's plan to save details about every Australian's online activity, by suggesting that we should CC him into every email conversation we have.

    (Not that) Louis Marx was responsible for a range of toy Daleks in the 1960s, some of which later found their way into the programme to represent armies of Daleks that the production could actually afford. (See, among others, Planet of the Daleks.)

    Here's Clayton Hickman's tweet about the poor condition of the Dalek props in Day of the Daleks.

    You won't want to miss Aubrey Woods singing The Candyman Can from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971).

    Brendan mentions Flight of the Darned, by farmageddon71, the person behind the 1990s special edition of The Five Doctors. No spoilers, but stop whatever you're doing right now and watch it immediately.

    Here's Sean Pertwee dressed up as his father dressed up as the Doctor for Halloween 2014.

    The Curse of Peladon

    The Radio Times review of The Curse of Peladon has a lovely publicity shot of Katy Manning complete with a stray hair roller. (Katy claims that these were actually shots from rehearsals rather than specially-staged publicity shots.)

    Arcturus, apparently, went on to have a prolific television career, starring as Bernard, part of Queen Asphyxia's triple husbandoid, in Blackadder's Christmas Carol.

    I am proud to announce that I have been unable to find all of Alpha Centauri's appearance on The Black and White Minstrel Show, although a brief clip can be seen here, as part of BabelColour's brilliant Every Doctor Who Story video.

    The Sea Devils

    Here are some lovely episodes of The Clangers for you to enjoy.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. Go on.



  • Punching Terry Walsh in the Face

    1 March 2015 (3:13am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 23 minutes and 6 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Brendan, Nathan and Todd return to space after a two-year absence in our last episode on Jon Pertwee's second season. It's time to don a hippie frock and visit Colony in Space, and then take a relaxing two-week holiday on location at a sleepy country village beset by The Daemons!

    Buy the stories!

    Colony in Space was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US)
    (Amazon UK)

    The Daemons was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US)
    (Amazon UK)

    (That was dull. Sorry.)

    Colony in Space

    The Good Life stars The Chief Caretaker and Lady Clemency Eddison as lovable middle-class eccentrics who decide, much like this story's colonists, to opt out of the capitalist rat-race and live self-sufficiently. You can find Vyvyan's take on the programme here.

    Hornets' Nest is a five-story audio drama series starring Tom Baker, Richard Franklin as Mike Yates and Captain Dent's almost-henchwoman Susan Jameson as Mrs Wibbsey. You can watch the official trailer for the series here.

    The Daemons

    Fans of weirdly incorrectly used Latin pronouns will enjoy this dictionary entry for the word qui quae quod. Doctor Which?

    Fans of sleepy English villages with a dark secret will enjoy the 1967 novel [Ritual](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritual_(Pinner_novel])) and its film adaptation The Wicker Man (1973), as well as the 1967 novel The Owl Service and its 1969 ITV adaptation. Fans of things that are fabulous will enjoy [watching the entire Avengers episode Murdersville for free online somehow](http://www.zimbio.com/watch/YYnqL0CgoKR/Murdersville/The+Avengers+(1961)).

    Fans of crackpot theories about human mythology being inspired by aliens will enjoy Erich Von Daniken's Chariots of the Gods?

    Picks of the week Brendan

    The story of Liz Shaw and the Doctor continues in the Big Finish Companion Chronicle The Sentinels of the New Dawn.

    Nathan

    The Randomiser, again, obviously.

    Check out this excellent new Doctor Who blog Crater of Needles, and follow it on Twitter at @CraterOfNeedles. It's edited by Stephen Wood, who can be found on Twitter at @StephenWood_UK.

    Todd

    The Sixth Doctor and Evelyn Smythe return to Axos in the Big Finish audio The Feast of Axos.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: we would really appreciate your help with publicising the show!



  • Episode 24 Punching Terry Walsh in the Face

    1 March 2015 (3:13am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 23 minutes and 6 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Brendan, Nathan and Todd return to space after a two-year absence in our last episode on Jon Pertwee's second season. It's time to don a hippie frock and visit Colony in Space, and then take a relaxing two-week holiday on location at a sleepy country village beset by The Daemons!

    Buy the stories!

    Colony in Space was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US)
    (Amazon UK)

    The Daemons was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US)
    (Amazon UK)

    (That was dull. Sorry.)

    Colony in Space

    The Good Life stars The Chief Caretaker and Lady Clemency Eddison as lovable middle-class eccentrics who decide, much like this story's colonists, to opt out of the capitalist rat-race and live self-sufficiently. You can find Vyvyan's take on the programme here.

    Hornets' Nest is a five-story audio drama series starring Tom Baker, Richard Franklin as Mike Yates and Captain Dent's almost-henchwoman Susan Jameson as Mrs Wibbsey. You can watch the official trailer for the series here.

    The Daemons

    Fans of weirdly incorrectly used Latin pronouns will enjoy this dictionary entry for the word qui quae quod. Doctor Which?

    Fans of sleepy English villages with a dark secret will enjoy the 1967 novel [Ritual](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritual_(Pinner_novel])) and its film adaptation The Wicker Man (1973), as well as the 1967 novel The Owl Service and its 1969 ITV adaptation. Fans of things that are fabulous will enjoy [watching the entire Avengers episode Murdersville for free online somehow](http://www.zimbio.com/watch/YYnqL0CgoKR/Murdersville/The+Avengers+(1961)).

    Fans of crackpot theories about human mythology being inspired by aliens will enjoy Erich Von Daniken's Chariots of the Gods?

    Picks of the week Brendan

    The story of Liz Shaw and the Doctor continues in the Big Finish Companion Chronicle The Sentinels of the New Dawn.

    Nathan

    The Randomiser, again, obviously.

    Check out this excellent new Doctor Who blog Crater of Needles, and follow it on Twitter at @CraterOfNeedles. It's edited by Stephen Wood, who can be found on Twitter at @StephenWood_UK.

    Todd

    The Sixth Doctor and Evelyn Smythe return to Axos in the Big Finish audio The Feast of Axos.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: we would really appreciate your help with publicising the show!



  • Episode 24: Punching Terry Walsh in the Face

    1 March 2015 (3:13am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 23 minutes and 6 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Brendan, Nathan and Todd return to space after a two-year absence in our last episode on Jon Pertwee's second season. It's time to don a hippie frock and visit Colony in Space, and then take a relaxing two-week holiday on location at a sleepy country village beset by The Daemons!

    Buy the stories!

    Colony in Space was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Daemons was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    (That was dull. Sorry.)

    Colony in Space

    The Good Life stars The Chief Caretaker and Lady Clemency Eddison as lovable middle-class eccentrics who decide, much like this story's colonists, to opt out of the capitalist rat-race and live self-sufficiently. You can find Vyvyan's take on the programme here.

    Hornets' Nest is a five-story audio drama series starring Tom Baker, Richard Franklin as Mike Yates and Captain Dent's almost-henchwoman Susan Jameson as Mrs Wibbsey. You can watch the official trailer for the series here.

    The Daemons

    Fans of weirdly incorrectly used Latin pronouns will enjoy this dictionary entry for the word qui quae quod. Doctor Which?

    Fans of sleepy English villages with a dark secret will enjoy the 1967 novel Ritual and its film adaptation The Wicker Man (1973), as well as the 1967 novel The Owl Service and its 1969 ITV adaptation. Fans of things that are fabulous will enjoy watching the entire Avengers episode Murdersville for free online somehow.

    Fans of crackpot theories about human mythology being inspired by aliens will enjoy Erich Von Daniken's Chariots of the Gods?

    Picks of the week Brendan

    The story of Liz Shaw and the Doctor continues in the Big Finish Companion Chronicle The Sentinels of the New Dawn.

    Nathan

    The Randomiser, again, obviously.

    Check out this excellent new Doctor Who blog Crater of Needles, and follow it on Twitter at @CraterOfNeedles. It's edited by Stephen Wood, who can be found on Twitter at @StephenWood_UK.

    Todd

    The Sixth Doctor and Evelyn Smythe return to Axos in the Big Finish audio The Feast of Axos.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: we would really appreciate your help with publicising the show!



  • Increasingly Baroque and Stupid

    15 February 2015 (7:24am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 31 minutes and 35 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's our second reboot in two years, and to celebrate Richard's sabbatical in Cambridge, we're joined by everyone's favourite ham-fisted bun vendor, Todd "Josephine" Beilby. And we're discussing the first three stories of Season 8: Terror of the Autons, The Mind of Evil and The Claws of Axos.

    Buy the stories!

    In England and Australia, Terror of the Autons was released on DVD as part of the Mannequin Mania box set. (Amazon UK). It was released separately in the US. (Amazon US)

    Check out Jo's facial expression on the Mind of Evil DVD cover. And Pertwee looks like he's just realised he left the gas on. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Claws of Axos has had a Special Edition DVD release. So there's that. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Terror of the Autons

    Paul Cornell's brutal 1993 review of Terror of the Autons from DWB can be found here.

    Here's Brendan dressed as Jo Grant from Day of the Daleks at Lords of Time 3 in December 2014.

    The Mind of Evil

    Sorry, Nathan, but Kate Orman doesn't give Corporal Bell brain cancer, but she does damage her brain in a terrible car accident in the otherwise brilliant The Left-Handed Hummingbird.

    David McIntee's novel Face of the Enemy has the Master working with UNIT while the Doctor and Jo are off mucking around on Peladon. Oh, and Corporal Bell gets sacked. Here's El Sandifer's review.

    Richard Franklin wrote a post-UNIT Mike Yates novel called The Killing Stone. You can even hear him reading it aloud, if that's your thing. (Audible US) (Audible UK). Paul Cornell definitively outed Mike Yates in the 50th Virgin New Adventures Novel Happy Endings.

    A work of fiction passes the Bechdel test if it contains a scene where two women talk to each other about something other than a man.

    Fans of caseless Dalek mutants as major story villains will enjoy the Big Finish audio The Elite.

    The Claws of Axos

    Bill Filer looks like he's wandered into The Claws of Axos on his way to appearing in The Champions or The Persuaders!.

    Brendan mentions the episode of Black Books where Bernard and Manny drunkenly write a children's book called The Elephant and the Balloon. You can find the entire episode on YouTube.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: your feedback will help other people to find the podcast. So off you go.



  • Episode 23 Increasingly Baroque and Stupid

    15 February 2015 (7:24am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 31 minutes and 35 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's our second reboot in two years, and to celebrate Richard's sabbatical in Cambridge, we're joined by everyone's favourite ham-fisted bun vendor, Todd "Josephine" Beilby. And we're discussing the first three stories of Season 8: Terror of the Autons, The Mind of Evil and The Claws of Axos.

    Buy the stories!

    In England and Australia, Terror of the Autons was released on DVD as part of the Mannequin Mania box set. (Amazon UK). It was released separately in the US. (Amazon US)

    Check out Jo's facial expression on the Mind of Evil DVD cover. And Pertwee looks like he's just realised he left the gas on. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Claws of Axos has had a Special Edition DVD release. So there's that. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Terror of the Autons

    Paul Cornell's brutal 1993 review of Terror of the Autons from DWB can be found here.

    Here's Brendan dressed as Jo Grant from Day of the Daleks at Lords of Time 3 in December 2014.

    The Mind of Evil

    Sorry, Nathan, but Kate Orman doesn't give Corporal Bell brain cancer, but she does damage her brain in a terrible car accident in the otherwise brilliant The Left-Handed Hummingbird.

    David McIntee's novel Face of the Enemy has the Master working with UNIT while the Doctor and Jo are off mucking around on Peladon. Oh, and Corporal Bell gets sacked. Here's Phil Sandifer's review.

    Richard Franklin wrote a post-UNIT Mike Yates novel called The Killing Stone. You can even hear him reading it aloud, if that's your thing. (Audible US) (Audible UK). Paul Cornell definitively outed Mike Yates in the 50th Virgin New Adventures Novel Happy Endings.

    A work of fiction passes the Bechdel test if it contains a scene where two women talk to each other about something other than a man.

    Fans of caseless Dalek mutants as major story villains will enjoy the Big Finish audio The Elite.

    The Claws of Axos

    Bill Filer looks like he's wandered into The Claws of Axos on his way to appearing in The Champions or The Persuaders!.

    Brendan mentions the episode of Black Books where Bernard and Manny drunkenly write a children's book called The Elephant and the Balloon. You can find the entire episode on YouTube.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: your feedback will help other people to find the podcast. So off you go.



  • Episode 23: Increasingly Baroque and Stupid

    15 February 2015 (7:24am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 31 minutes and 35 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's our second reboot in two years, and to celebrate Richard's sabbatical in Cambridge, we're joined by everyone's favourite ham-fisted bun vendor, Todd "Josephine" Beilby. And we're discussing the first three stories of Season 8: Terror of the Autons, The Mind of Evil and The Claws of Axos.

    Buy the stories!

    In England and Australia, Terror of the Autons was released on DVD as part of the Mannequin Mania box set. (Amazon UK). It was released separately in the US. (Amazon US)

    Check out Jo's facial expression on the Mind of Evil DVD cover. And Pertwee looks like he's just realised he left the gas on. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Claws of Axos has had a Special Edition DVD release. So there's that. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Terror of the Autons

    Paul Cornell's brutal 1993 review of Terror of the Autons from DWB can be found here.

    Here's Brendan dressed as Jo Grant from Day of the Daleks at Lords of Time 3 in December 2014.

    The Mind of Evil

    Sorry, Nathan, but Kate Orman doesn't give Corporal Bell brain cancer, but she does damage her brain in a terrible car accident in the otherwise brilliant The Left-Handed Hummingbird.

    David McIntee's novel Face of the Enemy has the Master working with UNIT while the Doctor and Jo are off mucking around on Peladon. Oh, and Corporal Bell gets sacked. Here's Phil Sandifer's review.

    Richard Franklin wrote a post-UNIT Mike Yates novel called The Killing Stone. You can even hear him reading it aloud, if that's your thing. (Audible US) (Audible UK). Paul Cornell definitively outed Mike Yates in the 50th Virgin New Adventures Novel Happy Endings.

    A work of fiction passes the Bechdel test if it contains a scene where two women talk to each other about something other than a man.

    Fans of caseless Dalek mutants as major story villains will enjoy the Big Finish audio The Elite.

    The Claws of Axos

    Bill Filer looks like he's wandered into The Claws of Axos on his way to appearing in The Champions or The Persuaders!.

    Brendan mentions the episode of Black Books where Bernard and Manny drunkenly write a children's book called The Elephant and the Balloon. You can find the entire episode on YouTube.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Todd is @toddbeilby and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: your feedback will help other people to find the podcast. So off you go.



  • Episode 22: Turducken

    1 February 2015 (1:55am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 25 minutes and 40 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    As our flight through the first season of post-Doctor Who Doctor Who comes to a close, Brendan, Richard and Nathan discuss The Ambassadors of Death and fan-favourite Inferno. Hold on tight: there's never been a bore like this one!

    Buy the stories!

    The Ambassadors of Death was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Inferno has had two DVD releases: the original in 2006, and a Special Edition in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Ambassadors...of DEATH!

    We've mentioned The Ipcress File (1965) before as an inspiration for Doctor Who during this period. Gosh, it's great. Have you watched it yet?

    ITC Entertainment was an English production company founded by Lew Grade in 1954, famous for producing high-quality, high-budget genre television for the international market. Its most famous shows include The Champions, The Prisoner, The Persuaders!, UFO and Space: 1999.

    The Scooby Doo/Doctor Who comic that Brendan mentions can be found here.

    Here's Peter Capaldi and Katy Manning larking around on the TARDIS set. And here's Peter and Janet Fielding from Janet's Twitter feed.

    Much to Nathan's horror, the adventures of Dr Liz Shaw continue in the BBV series P.R.O.B.E., which also stars Louise Jameson, Jon Pertwee, Peter Davison, Sylvester McCoy, Terry Molloy, Mark Gatiss and Reece Shearsmith (TV's Patrick Troughton).

    Fans of kissing Peter Davison will enjoy David Walliams and Mark Gatiss in The Kidnappers, which can be found on Disc 1 of The Beginning DVD box set.

    Counter-Measures is a Big Finish spin-off series chronicling the further adventures of Group Captain Gilmore, Professor Rachel Jensen and Allison Williams from Remembrance of the Daleks.

    And while we're on the subjects of Mark Gatiss and Big Finish, Richard loves Invaders from Mars, starring Paul McGann and India Fisher.

    Inferno

    WTF is a Turducken?

    Fans of digging crazy deep holes into the Earth's mantle will enjoy this account of the real-world Project Mohole.

    Arthur Conan Doyle's story When the World Screamed (1928), featuring another doomed attempt to drill into the Earth's mantle, can be read and downloaded here.

    And yet another Big Finish spin-off, starring Christopher Benjamin as Henry Gordon Jago: Jago and Litefoot, soon to enter its tenth season. Great Jumping Jehoshaphat!

    Picks of the Week Brendan

    Caroline John reads the Target novelisation of Doctor Who and the Cave Monsters, by Malcolm Hulke. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Nathan

    The recently reissued Target novelisation of Doctor Who and the Auton Invasion. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    And Mark Gatiss's radio documentary From the Outside it Looked Like an Old-Fashioned Police Box, which chronicles the history and legacy of the Target novelisations.

    Richard

    As mentioned above, the ITC Entertainment production UFO -- essential for your understanding of genre television of the early 1970s.

    Brendan again

    The inexplicably fabulous Japanese versions of some early Target novelisations. You can see the covers and the wacky Japanese titles on this site here.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: we would be very grateful for your feedback. Five-star reviews always welcome.



  • Turducken

    1 February 2015 (1:55am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 25 minutes and 40 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    As our flight through the first season of post-Doctor Who Doctor Who comes to a close, Brendan, Richard and Nathan discuss The Ambassadors of Death and fan-favourite Inferno. Hold on tight: there's never been a bore like this one!

    Buy the stories!

    The Ambassadors of Death was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Inferno has had two DVD releases: the original in 2006, and a Special Edition in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Ambassadors...of DEATH!

    We've mentioned The Ipcress File (1965) before as an inspiration for Doctor Who during this period. Gosh, it's great. Have you watched it yet?

    ITC Entertainment was an English production company founded by Lew Grade in 1954, famous for producing high-quality, high-budget genre television for the international market. Its most famous shows include The Champions, The Prisoner, The Persuaders!, UFO and Space: 1999.

    The Scooby Doo/Doctor Who comic that Brendan mentions can be found here.

    Here's Peter Capaldi and Katy Manning larking around on the TARDIS set. And here's Peter and Janet Fielding from Janet's Twitter feed.

    Much to Nathan's horror, the adventures of Dr Liz Shaw continue in the BBV series P.R.O.B.E., which also stars Louise Jameson, Jon Pertwee, Peter Davison, Sylvester McCoy, Terry Molloy, Mark Gatiss and Reece Shearsmith (TV's Patrick Troughton).

    Fans of kissing Peter Davison will enjoy David Walliams and Mark Gatiss in The Kidnappers, which can be found on Disc 1 of The Beginning DVD box set.

    Counter-Measures is a Big Finish spin-off series chronicling the further adventures of Group Captain Gilmore, Professor Rachel Jensen and Allison Williams from Remembrance of the Daleks.

    And while we're on the subjects of Mark Gatiss and Big Finish, Richard loves Invaders from Mars, starring Paul McGann and India Fisher.

    Inferno

    WTF is a Turducken?

    Fans of digging crazy deep holes into the Earth's mantle will enjoy this account of the real-world Project Mohole.

    Arthur Conan Doyle's story When the World Screamed (1928), featuring another doomed attempt to drill into the Earth's mantle, can be read and downloaded here.

    And yet another Big Finish spin-off, starring Christopher Benjamin as Henry Gordon Jago: Jago and Litefoot, soon to enter its tenth season. Great Jumping Jehoshaphat!

    Picks of the Week Brendan

    Caroline John reads the Target novelisation of Doctor Who and the Cave Monsters, by Malcolm Hulke. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Nathan

    The recently reissued Target novelisation of Doctor Who and the Auton Invasion. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    And Mark Gatiss's radio documentary From the Outside it Looked Like an Old-Fashioned Police Box, which chronicles the history and legacy of the Target novelisations.

    Richard

    As mentioned above, the ITC Entertainment production UFO -- essential for your understanding of genre television of the early 1970s.

    Brendan again

    The inexplicably fabulous Japanese versions of some early Target novelisations. You can see the covers and the wacky Japanese titles on this site here.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: we would be very grateful for your feedback. Five-star reviews always welcome.



  • Episode 22 Turducken

    1 February 2015 (1:55am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 25 minutes and 40 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    As our flight through the first season of post-Doctor Who Doctor Who comes to a close, Brendan, Richard and Nathan discuss The Ambassadors of Death and fan-favourite Inferno. Hold on tight: there's never been a bore like this one!

    Buy the stories!

    The Ambassadors of Death was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Inferno has had two DVD releases: the original in 2006, and a Special Edition in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Ambassadors...of DEATH!

    We've mentioned The Ipcress File (1965) before as an inspiration for Doctor Who during this period. Gosh, it's great. Have you watched it yet?

    ITC Entertainment was an English production company founded by Lew Grade in 1954, famous for producing high-quality, high-budget genre television for the international market. Its most famous shows include The Champions, The Prisoner, The Persuaders!, UFO and Space: 1999.

    The Scooby Doo/Doctor Who comic that Brendan mentions can be found here.

    Here's Peter Capaldi and Katy Manning larking around on the TARDIS set. And here's Peter and Janet Fielding from Janet's Twitter feed.

    Much to Nathan's horror, the adventures of Dr Liz Shaw continue in the BBV series P.R.O.B.E., which also stars Louise Jameson, Jon Pertwee, Peter Davison, Sylvester McCoy, Terry Molloy, Mark Gatiss and Reece Shearsmith (TV's Patrick Troughton).

    Fans of kissing Peter Davison will enjoy David Walliams and Mark Gatiss in The Kidnappers, which can be found on Disc 1 of The Beginning DVD box set.

    Counter-Measures is a Big Finish spin-off series chronicling the further adventures of Group Captain Gilmore, Professor Rachel Jensen and Allison Williams from Remembrance of the Daleks.

    And while we're on the subjects of Mark Gatiss and Big Finish, Richard loves Invaders from Mars, starring Paul McGann and India Fisher.

    Inferno

    WTF is a Turducken?

    Fans of digging crazy deep holes into the Earth's mantle will enjoy this account of the real-world Project Mohole.

    Arthur Conan Doyle's story When the World Screamed (1928), featuring another doomed attempt to drill into the Earth's mantle, can be read and downloaded here.

    And yet another Big Finish spin-off, starring Christopher Benjamin as Henry Gordon Jago: Jago and Litefoot, soon to enter its tenth season. Great Jumping Jehoshaphat!

    Picks of the Week Brendan

    Caroline John reads the Target novelisation of Doctor Who and the Cave Monsters, by Malcolm Hulke. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Nathan

    The recently reissued Target novelisation of Doctor Who and the Auton Invasion. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    And Mark Gatiss's radio documentary From the Outside it Looked Like an Old-Fashioned Police Box, which chronicles the history and legacy of the Target novelisations.

    Richard

    As mentioned above, the ITC Entertainment production UFO -- essential for your understanding of genre television of the early 1970s.

    Brendan again

    The inexplicably fabulous Japanese versions of some early Target novelisations. You can see the covers and the wacky Japanese titles on this site here.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, and Nathan is @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: we would be very grateful for your feedback. Five-star reviews always welcome.



  • Episode 21 They've Cancelled My Show

    18 January 2015 (12:15am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 21 minutes and 43 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    We've jumped a time track only to find ourselves in the 1970s, watching a strange parallel-universe version of our favourite show. Where's the TARDIS gone? What's with all these different colours? And, most importantly, what's happened to the Doctor's nose? Join us, my dear fellow, as we try to find the answers to some of these questions by watching the first two stories of Jon Pertwee's first season, Spearhead from Space and Doctor Who and the Silurians.

    Buy the stories!

    From now on, not only do all the stories exist, but they've all been released on DVD. So this bit's easy.

    • Spearhead from Space (Amazon US). In the UK, it can be bought as part of the Mannequin Mania box set, which includes Terror of the Autons. A must-have. (Amazon UK)
    • Spearhead from Space on Blu-ray, in stunning HD (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    • Doctor Who and the Silurians is published as part of the Beneath the Surface box set, which includes The Sea Devils and Warriors of the Deep (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Spearhead from Space

    Kim Catrall, from Sex and the City and, of course, Star Trek VI (1991), played a slightly less lethal and slightly more creepy mannequin in the film, er, Mannequin (1987).

    [The Avengers](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Avengers_(TV_series)) and Peter Wyngarde's Jason King both have a history of strong, fabulous women, but none more strong and fabulous than Caroline John's Liz Shaw. (Oh, okay, Emma Peel.)

    Even in the early 70s, millions of deprived Britons would tune into radio comedies like Round the Horne and The Navy Lark, starring Jon Pertwee.

    If you're thrillingly open-minded, you might enjoy the idea of agalmatophilia, which is a fetish involving sexual attraction to a statue or mannequin. If not, I'm sorry I brought it up.

    Terrance Dicks's novelisation of this story, The Auton Invasion, has been recently re-released as a paperback. It's also available on the Kindle. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of the moments of gritty realism in 1970s Who might enjoy Steve McQueen in Bullitt (1968), Michael Caine in Get Carter (1971) or Dennis Waterman in The Sweeney. Fans of Pertwee hurtling down the hill in a wheelchair might enjoy the Ealing Comedies of the 1950s.

    Captain Kremmen was an important part of Richard and Nathan's childhood. You can get a taste of it here. Watch it on YouTube. You won't regret it. (Oh, okay, you might.)

    Moonboots and Dinner Suits is Jon Pertwee's autobiography, first published in 1985. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Doctor Who and the Silurians

    Derrick Sherwin and Peter Bryant had an escape plan in the form of Special Project Air. It didn't really work out though.

    Watch Jennifer Saunders as Jane Seymour in Doctor Quinn: Mad Woman.

    Malcolm Hulke's novelisation of this story, Doctor Who and the Cave-Monsters, was also recently re-released, both in paperback and for the Kindle. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). Caroline John reads the audiobook, and does a superb impersonations of both Jon Pertwee and Fulton Mackay. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    The New Series Silurians are based very closely on the Voth from the Star Trek: Voyager episode [Distant Origin](http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Distant_Origin_(episode)), who were in turn based loosely on the Silurians from this story.

    Gerry Anderson's The Secret Service stars a marionette vicar who solves crimes. Aren't you glad to live in a world where such things exist?

    "I'm a Silurian. And I'm going for my tea break."

    We have a competition

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, and Nathan is, unimaginatively enough, @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our groovily-revamped website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: we're desperate to reach new heights of internet fame.



  • They've Cancelled My Show

    18 January 2015 (12:15am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 21 minutes and 43 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    We've jumped a time track only to find ourselves in the 1970s, watching a strange parallel-universe version of our favourite show. Where's the TARDIS gone? What's with all these different colours? And, most importantly, what's happened to the Doctor's nose? Join us, my dear fellow, as we try to find the answers to some of these questions by watching the first two stories of Jon Pertwee's first season, Spearhead from Space and Doctor Who and the Silurians.

    Buy the stories!

    From now on, not only do all the stories exist, but they've all been released on DVD. So this bit's easy.

    • Spearhead from Space (Amazon US). In the UK, it can be bought as part of the Mannequin Mania box set, which includes Terror of the Autons. A must-have. (Amazon UK)
    • Spearhead from Space on Blu-ray, in stunning HD (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    • Doctor Who and the Silurians is published as part of the Beneath the Surface box set, which includes The Sea Devils and Warriors of the Deep (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Spearhead from Space

    Kim Catrall, from Sex and the City and, of course, Star Trek VI (1991), played a slightly less lethal and slightly more creepy mannequin in the film, er, Mannequin (1987).

    The Avengers and Peter Wyngarde's Jason King both have a history of strong, fabulous women, but none more strong and fabulous than Caroline John's Liz Shaw. (Oh, okay, Emma Peel.)

    Even in the early 70s, millions of deprived Britons would tune into radio comedies like Round the Horne and The Navy Lark, starring Jon Pertwee.

    If you're thrillingly open-minded, you might enjoy the idea of agalmatophilia, which is a fetish involving sexual attraction to a statue or mannequin. If not, I'm sorry I brought it up.

    Terrance Dicks's novelisation of this story, The Auton Invasion, has been recently re-released as a paperback. It's also available on the Kindle. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of the moments of gritty realism in 1970s Who might enjoy Steve McQueen in Bullitt (1968), Michael Caine in Get Carter (1971) or Dennis Waterman in The Sweeney. Fans of Pertwee hurtling down the hill in a wheelchair might enjoy the Ealing Comedies of the 1950s.

    Captain Kremmen was an important part of Richard and Nathan's childhood. You can get a taste of it here. Watch it on YouTube. You won't regret it. (Oh, okay, you might.)

    Moonboots and Dinner Suits is Jon Pertwee's autobiography, first published in 1985. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Doctor Who and the Silurians

    Derrick Sherwin and Peter Bryant had an escape plan in the form of Special Project Air. It didn't really work out though.

    Watch Jennifer Saunders as Jane Seymour in Doctor Quinn: Mad Woman.

    Malcolm Hulke's novelisation of this story, Doctor Who and the Cave-Monsters, was also recently re-released, both in paperback and for the Kindle. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). Caroline John reads the audiobook, and does a superb impersonations of both Jon Pertwee and Fulton Mackay. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    The New Series Silurians are based very closely on the Voth from the Star Trek: Voyager episode [Distant Origin](http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Distant_Origin_(episode)), who were in turn based loosely on the Silurians from this story.

    Gerry Anderson's The Secret Service stars a marionette vicar who solves crimes. Aren't you glad to live in a world where such things exist?

    "I'm a Silurian. And I'm going for my tea break."

    We have a competition

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, and Nathan is, unimaginatively enough, @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our groovily-revamped website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: we're desperate to reach new heights of internet fame.



  • Episode 21: They've Cancelled My Show

    18 January 2015 (12:15am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 21 minutes and 43 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    We've jumped a time track only to find ourselves in the 1970s, watching a strange parallel-universe version of our favourite show. Where's the TARDIS gone? What's with all these different colours? And, most importantly, what's happened to the Doctor's nose? Join us, my dear fellow, as we try to find the answers to some of these questions by watching the first two stories of Jon Pertwee's first season, Spearhead from Space and Doctor Who and the Silurians.

    Buy the stories!

    From now on, not only do all the stories exist, but they've all been released on DVD. So this bit's easy.

    • Spearhead from Space (Amazon US). In the UK, it can be bought as part of the Mannequin Mania box set, which includes Terror of the Autons. A must-have. (Amazon UK)

    • Spearhead from Space on Blu-ray, in stunning HD (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    • Doctor Who and the Silurians is published as part of the Beneath the Surface box set, which includes The Sea Devils and Warriors of the Deep (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Spearhead from Space

    Kim Catrall, from Sex and the City and, of course, Star Trek VI (1991), played a slightly less lethal and slightly more creepy mannequin in the film, er, Mannequin (1987).

    The Avengers and Peter Wyngarde's Jason King both have a history of strong, fabulous women, but none more strong and fabulous than Caroline John's Liz Shaw. (Oh, okay, Emma Peel.)

    Even in the early 70s, millions of deprived Britons would tune into radio comedies like Round the Horne and The Navy Lark, starring Jon Pertwee.

    If you're thrillingly open-minded, you might enjoy the idea of agalmatophilia, which is a fetish involving sexual attraction to a statue or mannequin. If not, I'm sorry I brought it up.

    Terrance Dicks's novelisation of this story, The Auton Invasion, has been recently re-released as a paperback. It's also available on the Kindle. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of the moments of gritty realism in 1970s Who might enjoy Steve McQueen in Bullitt (1968), Michael Caine in Get Carter (1971) or Dennis Waterman in The Sweeney. Fans of Pertwee hurtling down the hill in a wheelchair might enjoy the Ealing Comedies of the 1950s.

    Captain Kremmen was an important part of Richard and Nathan's childhood. You can get a taste of it here. Watch it on YouTube. You won't regret it. (Oh, okay, you might.)

    Moonboots and Dinner Suits is Jon Pertwee's autobiography, first published in 1985. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Doctor Who and the Silurians

    Derrick Sherwin and Peter Bryant had an escape plan in the form of Special Project Air. It didn't really work out though.

    Watch Jennifer Saunders as Jane Seymour in Doctor Quinn: Mad Woman.

    Malcolm Hulke's novelisation of this story, Doctor Who and the Cave-Monsters, was also recently re-released, both in paperback and for the Kindle. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). Caroline John reads the audiobook, and does a superb impersonations of both Jon Pertwee and Fulton Mackay. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    The New Series Silurians are based very closely on the Voth from the Star Trek: Voyager episode Distant Origin, who were in turn based loosely on the Silurians from this story.

    Gerry Anderson's The Secret Service stars a marionette vicar who solves crimes. Aren't you glad to live in a world where such things exist?

    "I'm a Silurian. And I'm going for my tea break."

    We have a competition

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just write a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, and Nathan is, unimaginatively enough, @nathanbottomley.You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our groovily-revamped website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes: we're desperate to reach new heights of internet fame.



  • Episode 20: How Can You Snog a Monoid?

    3 January 2015 (10:01pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes and 2 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In this Very Special Episode, Brendan, Richard and Nathan are interviewed by Doctor Who convention impresario Todd Beilby about their experience of podcasting their way through Doctor Who in the sixties. Hartnell, Troughton or Cushing? Barbara, Polly or Zoe? (Barbara, obviously.) What's our favourite story? Our favourite moment? Our favourite villain? Our favourite pratfall? And, most importantly, what have we learned from our flight through entirety?

    Special thanks to friend-of-the-podcast Peter Griffiths for his help with the questions.

    Links
    • Anita Sarkeesian's series Tropes vs Women in Video Games can be found at the Feminist Frequency Website.

    • Anneke Wills's autobiographies can all be found and ordered from her website.

    • The Voord return in the recently-released Big Finish audio The Domain of the Voord. And the Nimon are back in Paul Cornell and Caroline Symcox's Seasons of Fear.

    • Annie Proulx regrets writing Brokeback Mountain.

    Follow us!

    As always, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook, check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com and rate or review us on iTunes. We can't wait to hear from you!



  • How Can You Snog a Monoid?

    3 January 2015 (10:01pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes and 2 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In this Very Special Episode, Brendan, Richard and Nathan are interviewed by Doctor Who convention impresario Todd Beilby about their experience of podcasting their way through Doctor Who in the sixties. Hartnell, Troughton or Cushing? Barbara, Polly or Zoe? (Barbara, obviously.) What's our favourite story? Our favourite moment? Our favourite villain? Our favourite pratfall? And, most importantly, what have we learned from our flight through entirety?

    Special thanks to friend-of-the-podcast Peter Griffiths for his help with the questions.

    Links
    • Anita Sarkeesian's series Tropes vs Women in Video Games can be found at the Feminist Frequency Website.
    • Anneke Wills's autobiographies can all be found and ordered from her website.

    • The Voord return in the recently-released Big Finish audio The Domain of the Voord. And the Nimon are back in Paul Cornell and Caroline Symcox's Seasons of Fear.

    • Annie Proulx regrets writing Brokeback Mountain.

    Follow us!

    As always, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook, check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com and rate or review us on iTunes. We can't wait to hear from you!



  • Episode 20 How Can You Snog a Monoid?

    3 January 2015 (10:01pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes and 2 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In this Very Special Episode, Brendan, Richard and Nathan are interviewed by Doctor Who convention impresario Todd Beilby about their experience of podcasting their way through Doctor Who in the sixties. Hartnell, Troughton or Cushing? Barbara, Polly or Zoe? (Barbara, obviously.) What's our favourite story? Our favourite moment? Our favourite villain? Our favourite pratfall? And, most importantly, what have we learned from our flight through entirety?

    Special thanks to friend-of-the-podcast Peter Griffiths for his help with the questions.

    Links
    • Anita Sarkeesian's series Tropes vs Women in Video Games can be found at the Feminist Frequency Website.
    • Anneke Wills's autobiographies can all be found and ordered from her website.

    • The Voord return in the recently-released Big Finish audio The Domain of the Voord. And the Nimon are back in Paul Cornell and Caroline Symcox's Seasons of Fear.

    • Annie Proulx regrets writing Brokeback Mountain.

    Follow us!

    As always, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook, check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com and rate or review us on iTunes. We can't wait to hear from you!



  • Episode 19 Hipster Klingon

    28 December 2014 (7:15am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes and 26 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Well, it's literally the end of an era. In our last episode for 2014, we discuss the last two stories of the 1960s, and the last two stories of the Patrick Troughton era, The Space Pirates and The War Games. No, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no!

    Buy the stories!

    The Space Pirates is the last story with missing episodes. Which is quite a relief. Episode 2 is the only one that remains: you can see it on the Lost in Time box set. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). An audio version exists, with linking narration by Frazer Hines. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    And Patrick Troughton's final story, and the last story of the 1960s, The War Games, has been released on DVD in its gloriously restored entirety. It costs nearly $400 on Amazon US for some reason; it's also available from Amazon UK at a much more sensible price.

    The Space Pirates

    Fans of slow-moving model spaceships will enjoy Stanley Kubrick's science fiction masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).

    Fans of Dudley Foster, who plays Pirate Captain Maurice Caven, will enjoy his appearance as Mr Goat in the Avengers episode "Something Nasty in the Nursery" (1967).

    Fans of dull James Bond films involving Kevin McClory will enjoy Thunderball (1965) and Never Say Never Again (1983).

    Fans of putting cowboys in space operas will enjoy the brilliant and tragically short-lived TV series Firefly. A lot.

    Fans of not wasting hours of their lives watching The Space Pirates will enjoy the the cut-down fifty-minute Whoflix version.

    The War Games

    Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) is Sir Richard Attenborough's musical take on World War I, based on a 1963 stage musical.

    Journey into Space by Charles Chilton, who also wrote Oh! What a Lovely War, was a science fiction radio series first broadcast on BBC radio between 1953 and 1958. (Philip Hincliffe mentions it in the DVD commentary for The Robots of Death.) It regularly out-rated TV programmes that were on at the same time. Some public-spirited individual has uploaded much of the series to YouTube.

    Astrophysicist Fred Hoyle's novel October the First Is Too Late was first published in 1966. Its world is splintered into different time zones by the effects of radiation or something, much like the battlefields of The War Games.

    As usal, fans of The Avengers should check out The Avengers TV website.

    Picks of the week Brendan

    Zoe Heriot's adventures continue after the Time Lords return her to the Wheel, in the Big Finish Companion Chronicles, particularly Echoes of Grey, The Memory Cheats and The Uncertainty Principle.

    Nathan

    Matthew Waterhouse's entertaining autobiography Blue Box Boy. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Richard

    Shockingly, Richard's been watching things other than Doctor Who, including Catweazle, starring the planet Chloris's very own Geoffrey Bayldon (Amazon US) (Amazon UK), and The Champions, co-created by Dennis Spooner. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just post a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us!

    As always, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook, check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com and rate or review us on iTunes. We can't wait to hear from you!



  • Hipster Klingon

    28 December 2014 (7:15am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes and 26 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Well, it's literally the end of an era. In our last episode for 2014, we discuss the last two stories of the 1960s, and the last two stories of the Patrick Troughton era, The Space Pirates and The War Games. No, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no!

    Buy the stories!

    The Space Pirates is the last story with missing episodes. Which is quite a relief. Episode 2 is the only one that remains: you can see it on the Lost in Time box set. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). An audio version exists, with linking narration by Frazer Hines. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    And Patrick Troughton's final story, and the last story of the 1960s, The War Games, has been released on DVD in its gloriously restored entirety. It costs nearly $400 on Amazon US for some reason; it's also available from Amazon UK at a much more sensible price.

    The Space Pirates

    Fans of slow-moving model spaceships will enjoy Stanley Kubrick's science fiction masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).

    Fans of Dudley Foster, who plays Pirate Captain Maurice Caven, will enjoy his appearance as Mr Goat in the Avengers episode "Something Nasty in the Nursery" (1967).

    Fans of dull James Bond films involving Kevin McClory will enjoy Thunderball (1965) and Never Say Never Again (1983).

    Fans of putting cowboys in space operas will enjoy the brilliant and tragically short-lived TV series Firefly. A lot.

    Fans of not wasting hours of their lives watching The Space Pirates will enjoy the the cut-down fifty-minute Whoflix version.

    The War Games

    Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) is Sir Richard Attenborough's musical take on World War I, based on a 1963 stage musical.

    Journey into Space by Charles Chilton, who also wrote Oh! What a Lovely War, was a science fiction radio series first broadcast on BBC radio between 1953 and 1958. (Philip Hincliffe mentions it in the DVD commentary for The Robots of Death.) It regularly out-rated TV programmes that were on at the same time. Some public-spirited individual has uploaded much of the series to YouTube.

    Astrophysicist Fred Hoyle's novel October the First Is Too Late was first published in 1966. Its world is splintered into different time zones by the effects of radiation or something, much like the battlefields of The War Games.

    As usal, fans of The Avengers should check out The Avengers TV website.

    Picks of the week Brendan

    Zoe Heriot's adventures continue after the Time Lords return her to the Wheel, in the Big Finish Companion Chronicles, particularly Echoes of Grey, The Memory Cheats and The Uncertainty Principle.

    Nathan

    Matthew Waterhouse's entertaining autobiography Blue Box Boy. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Richard

    Shockingly, Richard's been watching things other than Doctor Who, including Catweazle, starring the planet Chloris's very own Geoffrey Bayldon (Amazon US) (Amazon UK), and The Champions, co-created by Dennis Spooner. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just post a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us!

    As always, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook, check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com and rate or review us on iTunes. We can't wait to hear from you!



  • Episode 19: Hipster Klingon

    28 December 2014 (7:15am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes and 25 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Well, it's literally the end of an era. In our last episode for 2014, we discuss the last two stories of the 1960s, and the last two stories of the Patrick Troughton era, The Space Pirates and The War Games. No, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no!

    Buy the stories!

    The Space Pirates is the last story with missing episodes. Which is quite a relief. Episode 2 is the only one that remains: you can see it on the Lost in Time box set. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). An audio version exists, with linking narration by Frazer Hines. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    And Patrick Troughton's final story, and the last story of the 1960s, The War Games, has been released on DVD in its gloriously restored entirety. It costs nearly $400 on Amazon US for some reason; it's also available from Amazon UK at a much more sensible price.

    The Space Pirates

    Fans of slow-moving model spaceships will enjoy Stanley Kubrick's science fiction masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).

    Fans of Dudley Foster, who plays Pirate Captain Maurice Caven, will enjoy his appearance as Mr Goat in the Avengers episode "Something Nasty in the Nursery" (1967).

    Fans of dull James Bond films involving Kevin McClory will enjoy Thunderball (1965) and Never Say Never Again (1983).

    Fans of putting cowboys in space operas will enjoy the brilliant and tragically short-lived TV series Firefly. A lot.

    Fans of not wasting hours of their lives watching The Space Pirates will enjoy the the cut-down fifty-minute Whoflix version.

    The War Games

    Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) is Sir Richard Attenborough's musical take on World War I, based on a 1963 stage musical.

    Journey into Space by Charles Chilton, who also wrote Oh! What a Lovely War, was a science fiction radio series first broadcast on BBC radio between 1953 and 1958. (Philip Hincliffe mentions it in the DVD commentary for The Robots of Death.) It regularly out-rated TV programmes that were on at the same time. Some public-spirited individual has uploaded much of the series to YouTube.

    Astrophysicist Fred Hoyle's novel October the First Is Too Late was first published in 1966. Its world is splintered into different time zones by the effects of radiation or something, much like the battlefields of The War Games.

    As usal, fans of The Avengers should check out The Avengers TV website.

    Picks of the week Brendan

    Zoe Heriot's adventures continue after the Time Lords return her to the Wheel, in the Big Finish Companion Chronicles, particularly Echoes of Grey, The Memory Cheats and The Uncertainty Principle.

    Nathan

    Matthew Waterhouse's entertaining autobiography Blue Box Boy. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Richard

    Shockingly, Richard's been watching things other than Doctor Who, including Catweazle, starring the planet Chloris's very own Geoffrey Bayldon (Amazon US) (Amazon UK), and The Champions, co-created by Dennis Spooner. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just post a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us!

    As always, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook, check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com and rate or review us on iTunes. We can't wait to hear from you!



  • Episode 18: Sideburn Trouble

    23 December 2014 (4:41am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 54 minutes and 57 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In this week's trippy episode, we say hello to Robert Holmes and goodbye to the BBC foam machine, as we discuss two stories from Patrick Troughton's final season: The Krotons and The Seeds of Death. Smell that hydrogen telluride. Very bracing.

    Buy the stories!

    For the first time in a very long while, both of the stories we cover this episode exist in their entirety. And they're both (kind of) worth watching! So off you go:

    The Krotons (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Seeds of Death (Amazon US)

    In the UK and Australia, The Seeds of Death: Special Edition was released on DVD as part of the Revisitations 2 box set, along with Carnival of Monsters and Resurrection of the Daleks. (Amazon UK)

    The Krotons

    Prison in Space by Dick Sharples was a truly horrifying script, mercifully dropped by the production team in favour of The Krotons. It was revived, unwisely, as a Big Finish audio drama, and released as part of the Second Doctor Box Set in 2010.

    More horrific sexism can be seen in The Worm that Turned, a series of "comedy" sketches from the 1980 season of The Two Ronnies. (Which is otherwise pretty great.)

    The Seeds of Death

    Let's get all literary for a moment. Brendan mentions The Machine Stops (1909) by E. M. Forster, an English writer perhaps best known for A Room with a View. In this short story, Forster imagines a future where humanity is completely dependent on technology, and the terrible consequences when that technology fails.

    H. G. Wells's The War of the Worlds (1898) tells the story of a Martian invasion of Southern England. It was famously adapted into a radio play by Orson Welles in 1938, a film by George Pal in 1953, a film by Steven Spielberg in 2005 (starring Tom Cruise) and a prog rock album by Jeff Wayne in 1978.

    Lords of the Red Planet was Brian Hayles's original script for this part of Season 6. It was dropped by the production team, only to be revived as a Big Finish audio drama in 2013.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just post a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us!

    As always, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook, check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com and rate or review us on iTunes. We can't wait to hear from you!



  • Sideburn Trouble

    23 December 2014 (4:41am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 54 minutes and 58 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In this week's trippy episode, we say hello to Robert Holmes and goodbye to the BBC foam machine, as we discuss two stories from Patrick Troughton's final season: The Krotons and The Seeds of Death. Smell that hydrogen telluride. Very bracing.

    Buy the stories!

    For the first time in a very long while, both of the stories we cover this episode exist in their entirety. And they're both (kind of) worth watching! So off you go:

    The Krotons (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Seeds of Death (Amazon US)

    In the UK and Australia, The Seeds of Death: Special Edition was released on DVD as part of the Revisitations 2 box set, along with Carnival of Monsters and Resurrection of the Daleks. (Amazon UK)

    The Krotons

    Prison in Space by Dick Sharples was a truly horrifying script, mercifully dropped by the production team in favour of The Krotons. It was revived, unwisely, as a Big Finish audio drama, and released as part of the Second Doctor Box Set in 2010.

    More horrific sexism can be seen in The Worm that Turned, a series of "comedy" sketches from the 1980 season of The Two Ronnies. (Which is otherwise pretty great.)

    The Seeds of Death

    Let's get all literary for a moment. Brendan mentions The Machine Stops (1909) by E. M. Forster, an English writer perhaps best known for A Room with a View. In this short story, Forster imagines a future where humanity is completely dependent on technology, and the terrible consequences when that technology fails.

    H. G. Wells's The War of the Worlds (1898) tells the story of a Martian invasion of Southern England. It was famously adapted into a radio play by Orson Welles in 1938, a film by George Pal in 1953, a film by Steven Spielberg in 2005 (starring Tom Cruise) and a prog rock album by Jeff Wayne in 1978.

    Lords of the Red Planet was Brian Hayles's original script for this part of Season 6. It was dropped by the production team, only to be revived as a Big Finish audio drama in 2013.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just post a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us!

    As always, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook, check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com and rate or review us on iTunes. We can't wait to hear from you!



  • Episode 18 Sideburn Trouble

    23 December 2014 (4:41am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 54 minutes and 58 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In this week's trippy episode, we say hello to Robert Holmes and goodbye to the BBC foam machine, as we discuss two stories from Patrick Troughton's final season: The Krotons and The Seeds of Death. Smell that hydrogen telluride. Very bracing.

    Buy the stories!

    For the first time in a very long while, both of the stories we cover this episode exist in their entirety. And they're both (kind of) worth watching! So off you go:

    The Krotons (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Seeds of Death (Amazon US)

    In the UK and Australia, The Seeds of Death: Special Edition was released on DVD as part of the Revisitations 2 box set, along with Carnival of Monsters and Resurrection of the Daleks. (Amazon UK)

    The Krotons

    Prison in Space by Dick Sharples was a truly horrifying script, mercifully dropped by the production team in favour of The Krotons. It was revived, unwisely, as a Big Finish audio drama, and released as part of the Second Doctor Box Set in 2010.

    More horrific sexism can be seen in The Worm that Turned, a series of "comedy" sketches from the 1980 season of The Two Ronnies. (Which is otherwise pretty great.)

    The Seeds of Death

    Let's get all literary for a moment. Brendan mentions The Machine Stops (1909) by E. M. Forster, an English writer perhaps best known for A Room with a View. In this short story, Forster imagines a future where humanity is completely dependent on technology, and the terrible consequences when that technology fails.

    H. G. Wells's The War of the Worlds (1898) tells the story of a Martian invasion of Southern England. It was famously adapted into a radio play by Orson Welles in 1938, a film by George Pal in 1953, a film by Steven Spielberg in 2005 (starring Tom Cruise) and a prog rock album by Jeff Wayne in 1978.

    Lords of the Red Planet was Brian Hayles's original script for this part of Season 6. It was dropped by the production team, only to be revived as a Big Finish audio drama in 2013.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win a Target novelisation from our personal collection, just post a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode. We'll be giving away three books every time we reach the end of a season.

    Follow us!

    As always, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook, check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com and rate or review us on iTunes. We can't wait to hear from you!



  • Episode 17: Surprise! I've Got a Moustache

    14 December 2014 (12:36am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 1 hour, 10 minutes and 6 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    All set, Jimmy? It's time for Flight Through Entirety to enter the final season of the 1960s, as we discuss a rapidly-improving and largely foam-free trio of stories: The Dominators, The Mind Robber and The Invasion.

    Buy the episodes!

    For once, all three of the stories we discuss in this episode have been released on DVD. So you can actually watch them. (Although, in some cases, you might not want to.)

    The Dominators episode 3 was returned to the archives in 1978, so we have all of it. Sigh. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Mind Robber has always existed. It was repeated on ABC-TV in Australia in 1986. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Invasion is still missing episodes 1 and 4, but they were expertly animated by Cosgrove Hall for the story's DVD release in 2006. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    The Dominators

    Fans of Joan and Jackie Collins won't want to miss their fabulous biopic by French & Saunders.

    Oh, God, what else? Philip Sandifer's review is a good place to go for a discussion of the horrible politics in this story. ("Not only is it an attack on the entire ethos that underlies the Doctor as a character, it's an attempt to twist and pervert the show away from what it is and towards something ugly, cruel, and just plain unpleasant." Yeesh.)

    The Mind Robber

    George Orwell's essay on Boys' Weeklies discusses the politics of the kind of stories written by the Master of Fiction before he was kidnapped by, er, whatever.

    According to The Living Handbook of Narratology, metalepsis is "any intrusion by the extradiegetic narrator or narratee into the diegetic universe (or by diegetic characters into a metadiegetic universe, etc.), or the inverse". And this story has metalepsis in spades. Don't tell me we're not educational.

    Edith Nesbit's Five Children and It, which sounds like a terrifying premise for a Stephen King sequel, is actually a famous English children's book, published in 1902. It's a part of the tradition of children's fantasy fiction which will eventually give rise to Doctor Who.

    You should also ignore Nathan and read Gulliver's Travels. It's really clever and funny and entertaining, particularly the bit where Gulliver puts out a fire in the Lilliputian palace by weeing on it. No really.

    The Invasion

    Richard identifies the inspiration for the incidental music as The Ipcress File (1965), a brilliant kind of anti-Bond spy film starring Michael Cain. Just watch it.

    Fans of Isobel Watkins and her modelling aspirations might enjoy Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow-Up (1996), a groovy film in which a very now young photographer, creeping on a mysterious woman in a park, accidentally photographs a murder.

    We have a competition!

    If you would like to win one of three 1970s Target novelisations from our personal collection, just post a comment on our website underneath the post for this episode.

    Follow us!

    Follow us on Twitter, or on Facebook. Check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes. We'd really appreciate it.



 
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