Overall Statistics

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast
Description:
Brendan, Richard, Todd and Nathan discuss the entire history of Doctor Who, season by season.

Homepage: http://www.flightthroughentirety.com/

RSS Feed: http://feeds.podtrac.com/QivDlm8raO5C

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast Statistics
Episodes:
395
Average Episode Duration:
58:26
Longest Episode Duration:
2:46:16
Total Duration of all Episodes:
16 days, 0 hours, 38 minutes and 11 seconds
Earliest Episode:
18 November 2018 (5:24am GMT)
Latest Episode:
11 November 2018 (6:57am GMT)
Average Time Between Episodes:
4 days, 3 hours, 1 minute and 56 seconds

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast Episodes

  • The Practical Problem with Leaving Someone Alive

    25 October 2015 (9:24am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 31 minutes and 17 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Well, we should have listened to Mrs Nethercott, really. Yet another story that we all love: the Graham Williams era kicks off with a spectacular Edwardian Base Under Siege(tm) -- it's Horror of Fang Rock!

    Buy the story!

    Horror of Fang Rock was released on DVD way back in 2005. So, no, you can't borrow my copy. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Richard's here this week, but despite that, we don't make many fabulously obscure references to British television from the 1960s and 70s. (Apart from the obligatory references to The Prisoner and Are You Being Served?, of course.)

    Here's the BBC miniseries Count Dracula (1977), which put paid to Terrance Dicks's original script, The Vampire Mutations, more of which later. It manages to be both tiresome and terrible, apparently. You can even buy it, if you feel you have to. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of television programmes that make you long for a Rutan to join the cast and massacre all the regulars will enjoy When the Boat Comes In, a BBC television series that ran from 1976 to 1981.

    Here's The Ballad of Flannan Isle, which is the poem Tom quotes at the end of the final episode. It's not great.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we shall find His Lordship and tell him just what a perfidious so-called friend you are.

    Bondfinger

    While the entire world goes crazy over what might be Daniel Craig's final outing as Bond (sob!), why not re-visit a much worse Bond film -- Thunderball (1965)? We'll all be donning wetsuits and recording our first underwater commentary next week, and releasing it the following weekend. In the meantime, you can enjoy our existing commentary tracks, Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 50 The Practical Problem with Leaving Someone Alive

    25 October 2015 (9:24am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 31 minutes and 17 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Well, we should have listened to Mrs Nethercott, really. Yet another story that we all love: the Graham Williams era kicks off with a spectacular Edwardian Base Under Siege(tm) -- it's Horror of Fang Rock!

    Buy the story!

    Horror of Fang Rock was released on DVD way back in 2005. So, no, you can't borrow my copy. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Richard's here this week, but despite that, we don't make many fabulously obscure references to British television from the 1960s and 70s. (Apart from the obligatory references to The Prisoner and Are You Being Served?, of course.)

    Here's the BBC miniseries Count Dracula (1977), which put paid to Terrance Dicks's original script, The Vampire Mutations, more of which later. It manages to be both tiresome and terrible, apparently. You can even buy it, if you feel you have to. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of television programmes that make you long for a Rutan to join the cast and massacre all the regulars will enjoy When the Boat Comes In, a BBC television series that ran from 1976 to 1981.

    Here's The Ballad of Flannan Isle, which is the poem Tom quotes at the end of the final episode. It's not great.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we shall find His Lordship and tell him just what a perfidious so-called friend you are.

    Bondfinger

    While the entire world goes crazy over what might be Daniel Craig's final outing as Bond (sob!), why not re-visit a much worse Bond film -- Thunderball (1965)? We'll all be donning wetsuits and recording our first underwater commentary next week, and releasing it the following weekend. In the meantime, you can enjoy our existing commentary tracks, Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 50: The Practical Problem with Leaving Someone Alive

    25 October 2015 (9:24am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 31 minutes and 17 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Well, we should have listened to Mrs Nethercott, really. Yet another story that we all love: the Graham Williams era kicks off with a spectacular Edwardian Base Under Siege(tm) -- it's Horror of Fang Rock!

    Buy the story!

    Horror of Fang Rock was released on DVD way back in 2005. So, no, you can't borrow my copy. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Richard's here this week, but despite that, we don't make many fabulously obscure references to British television from the 1960s and 70s. (Apart from the obligatory references to The Prisoner and Are You Being Served?, of course.)

    Here's the BBC miniseries Count Dracula (1977), which put paid to Terrance Dicks's original script, The Vampire Mutations, more of which later. It manages to be both tiresome and terrible, apparently. You can even buy it, if you feel you have to. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of television programmes that make you long for a Rutan to join the cast and massacre all the regulars will enjoy When the Boat Comes In, a BBC television series that ran from 1976 to 1981.

    Here's The Ballad of Flannan Isle, which is the poem Tom quotes at the end of the final episode. It's not great.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we shall find His Lordship and tell him just what a perfidious so-called friend you are.

    Bondfinger

    While the entire world goes crazy over what might be Daniel Craig's final outing as Bond (sob!), why not re-visit a much worse Bond film -- Thunderball (1965)? We'll all be donning wetsuits and recording our first underwater commentary next week, and releasing it the following weekend. In the meantime, you can enjoy our existing commentary tracks, Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Equal Opportunity Death

    18 October 2015 (9:39am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 50 minutes and 51 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, we risk the goodwill of our entire audience by spending the first 18 minutes of the episode discussing the appalling racism of fan favourite The Talons of Weng-Chiang. After that, Brendan and Todd talk about how great the story is, while Nathan just says Do you know what I mean? over and over again.

    Buy the story!

    The Talons of Weng-Chiang was released on DVD as a Special Edition in 2010/2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    You can buy The Doctor Who Discontinuity Guide as an ebook on Amazon (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). You can find most of the content for free (you cheapskate) by following the links from the Fourth Doctor page on the archived BBC Doctor Who website. We diss it this episode, but it's actually really great.

    Less great is Doctor Who: The Television Companion, by Howe and Walker. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of completely ruining the Sontarans, who are totally a credible and interesting threat, will enjoy the upcoming Big Finish series Jago and Litefoot and Strax. The first episode will be out in November.

    Henry Higgins and Colonel Pickering go off to buy a dress for Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady (1964).

    The simple analogy from Star Trek is fabulously referenced in the Futurama episode Where No Fan Has Gone Before.

    Fans of Joanna Lumley and ludicrous giant rats will enjoy the New Avengers episode Gnaws.

    Picks of the week Todd

    This week, Todd recommends the Big Finish Jago & Litefoot series, which has been going on for, like, 9 years. The delightful Pamela Salem returns in _Counter-Measures_, but, frankly, she's more glamorous than they deserve.

    Brendan

    Those of you who think we're being oversensitive won't enjoy this video from Buzzfeed, East Asians React to Yellowface.

    Foe from the Future is a Big Finish audio that, in a nearby parallel universe, might have replaced The Talons of Weng-Chiang.

    Nathan

    Well, Nathan got nearly everthing wrong about his pick. You can find the Blakes 7 podcast Down and Safe here. They release a new episode every fortnight, or every two weeks if you come from the United States.

    The boys from the Doctor Who Trust Your Doctor podcast join forces with the boys from The Krynoid Podcast to discuss Revenge of the Cybermen. And we're totally not jealous.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll lurk sympathetically around your front door, and creepily refer to you as the budding lotus of the dawn.

    Bondfinger

    Our James Bond commentary podcast continues: we already have tracks for Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962), while Thunderball (1965) will be out mere weeks from now. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 49 Equal Opportunity Death

    18 October 2015 (9:39am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 50 minutes and 51 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, we risk the goodwill of our entire audience by spending the first 18 minutes of the episode discussing the appalling racism of fan favourite The Talons of Weng-Chiang. After that, Brendan and Todd talk about how great the story is, while Nathan just says Do you know what I mean? over and over again.

    Buy the story!

    The Talons of Weng-Chiang was released on DVD as a Special Edition in 2010/2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    You can buy The Doctor Who Discontinuity Guide as an ebook on Amazon (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). You can find most of the content for free (you cheapskate) by following the links from the Fourth Doctor page on the archived BBC Doctor Who website. We diss it this episode, but it's actually really great.

    Less great is Doctor Who: The Television Companion, by Howe and Walker. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of completely ruining the Sontarans, who are totally a credible and interesting threat, will enjoy the upcoming Big Finish series Jago and Litefoot and Strax. The first episode will be out in November.

    Henry Higgins and Colonel Pickering go off to buy a dress for Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady (1964).

    The simple analogy from Star Trek is fabulously referenced in the Futurama episode Where No Fan Has Gone Before.

    Fans of Joanna Lumley and ludicrous giant rats will enjoy the New Avengers episode Gnaws.

    Picks of the week Todd

    This week, Todd recommends the Big Finish Jago & Litefoot series, which has been going on for, like, 9 years. The delightful Pamela Salem returns in _Counter-Measures_, but, frankly, she's more glamorous than they deserve.

    Brendan

    Those of you who think we're being oversensitive won't enjoy this video from Buzzfeed, East Asians React to Yellowface.

    Foe from the Future is a Big Finish audio that, in a nearby parallel universe, might have replaced The Talons of Weng-Chiang.

    Nathan

    Well, Nathan got nearly everthing wrong about his pick. You can find the Blakes 7 podcast Down and Safe here. They release a new episode every fortnight, or every two weeks if you come from the United States.

    The boys from the Doctor Who Trust Your Doctor podcast join forces with the boys from The Krynoid Podcast to discuss Revenge of the Cybermen. And we're totally not jealous.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll lurk sympathetically around your front door, and creepily refer to you as the budding lotus of the dawn.

    Bondfinger

    Our James Bond commentary podcast continues: we already have tracks for Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962), while Thunderball (1965) will be out mere weeks from now. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 49: Equal Opportunity Death

    18 October 2015 (9:39am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 50 minutes and 51 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, we risk the goodwill of our entire audience by spending the first 18 minutes of the episode discussing the appalling racism of fan favourite The Talons of Weng-Chiang. After that, Brendan and Todd talk about how great the story is, while Nathan just says Do you know what I mean? over and over again.

    Buy the story!

    The Talons of Weng-Chiang was released on DVD as a Special Edition in 2010/2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    You can buy The Doctor Who Discontinuity Guide as an ebook on Amazon (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). You can find most of the content for free (you cheapskate) by following the links from the Fourth Doctor page on the archived BBC Doctor Who website. We diss it this episode, but it's actually really great.

    Less great is Doctor Who: The Television Companion, by Howe and Walker. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Fans of completely ruining the Sontarans, who are totally a credible and interesting threat, will enjoy the upcoming Big Finish series Jago and Litefoot and Strax. The first episode will be out in November.

    Henry Higgins and Colonel Pickering go off to buy a dress for Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady (1964).

    The simple analogy from Star Trek is fabulously referenced in the Futurama episode Where No Fan Has Gone Before.

    Fans of Joanna Lumley and ludicrous giant rats will enjoy the New Avengers episode Gnaws.

    Picks of the week Todd

    This week, Todd recommends the Big Finish Jago & Litefoot series, which has been going on for, like, 9 years. The delightful Pamela Salem returns in Counter-Measures, but, frankly, she's more glamorous than they deserve.

    Brendan

    Those of you who think we're being oversensitive won't enjoy this video from Buzzfeed, East Asians React to Yellowface.

    Foe from the Future is a Big Finish audio that, in a nearby parallel universe, might have replaced The Talons of Weng-Chiang.

    Nathan

    Well, Nathan got nearly everthing wrong about his pick. You can find the Blakes 7 podcast Down and Safe here. They release a new episode every fortnight, or every two weeks if you come from the United States.

    The boys from the Doctor Who Trust Your Doctor podcast join forces with the boys from The Krynoid Podcast to discuss Revenge of the Cybermen. And we're totally not jealous.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll lurk sympathetically around your front door, and creepily refer to you as the budding lotus of the dawn.

    Bondfinger

    Our James Bond commentary podcast continues: we already have tracks for Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962), while Thunderball (1965) will be out mere weeks from now. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 48: Midichlorians

    11 October 2015 (8:10am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 31 minutes and 31 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Pamela Salem is a goddess and The Robots of Death is just briliant. Is there anything more to say here?

    Buy the story!

    The Robots of Death was the first proper Doctor Who DVD release way back in 2000/2001. Does that make you feel old? The Special Edition was released in 2012 as part of the Revisitations 3 box set in Australia and the UK, and individually in the US. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Sapphire and Steel was an amazingly weird and almost unwatchably slow ITV series starring time agents Joanna Lumley and David McCallum as Sapphire and Steel respectively. David Collings, who played Poul in this story, occasionally guested as Silver.

    Well, these are Doctor Who's Blake's 7 years, so here goes. Chris Boucher, who wrote this story, was the script editor of Blake's 7, and went on to write lots of fabulously bitchy dialog over Blake's 7's four seasons. Borg is played by Brian Croucher, who played Travis in Blake's 7 Season 2, and Miles Fothergill, who played camp newsreader robot SV7, played some guy in the Blake's 7 episode The Web.

    Fans of doing your hair and makeup in preparation for your big villain moment will enjoy Cancer in the Blake's 7 Season 4 episode Assassin.

    Fans of the worst atrocities in human history will enjoy this amazing video of Wonder Woman riding a skateboard.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll make snide remarks about the inverse ratio between the size of your mouth and the size of your brain.

    Bondfinger

    Check out our commentaries on the first three Bond films, Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 48 Midichlorians

    11 October 2015 (8:10am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 8 minutes and 29 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Pamela Salem is a goddess and The Robots of Death is just brilliant. Is there anything more to say here?

    Buy the story!

    The Robots of Death was the first proper Doctor Who DVD release way back in 2000/2001. Does that make you feel old? The Special Edition was released in 2012 as part of the Revisitations 3 box set in Australia and the UK, and individually in the US. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Sapphire and Steel was an amazingly weird and almost unwatchably slow ITV series starring time agents Joanna Lumley and David McCallum as Sapphire and Steel respectively. David Collings, who played Poul in this story, occasionally guested as Silver.

    Well, these are Doctor Who's Blake's 7 years, so here goes. Chris Boucher, who wrote this story, was the script editor of Blake's 7, and went on to write lots of fabulously bitchy dialog over Blake's 7's four seasons. Borg is played by Brian Croucher, who played Travis in Blake's 7 Season 2, and Miles Fothergill, who played camp newsreader robot SV7, played some guy in the Blake's 7 episode The Web.

    Fans of doing your hair and makeup in preparation for your big villain moment will enjoy Cancer in the Blake's 7 Season 4 episode Assassin.

    Fans of the worst atrocities in human history will enjoy this amazing video of Wonder Woman riding a skateboard.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll make snide remarks about the inverse ratio between the size of your mouth and the size of your brain.

    Bondfinger

    Check out our commentaries on the first three Bond films, Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Midichlorians

    11 October 2015 (8:10am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 31 minutes and 31 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Pamela Salem is a goddess and The Robots of Death is just brilliant. Is there anything more to say here?

    Buy the story!

    The Robots of Death was the first proper Doctor Who DVD release way back in 2000/2001. Does that make you feel old? The Special Edition was released in 2012 as part of the Revisitations 3 box set in Australia and the UK, and individually in the US. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Sapphire and Steel was an amazingly weird and almost unwatchably slow ITV series starring time agents Joanna Lumley and David McCallum as Sapphire and Steel respectively. David Collings, who played Poul in this story, occasionally guested as Silver.

    Well, these are Doctor Who's Blake's 7 years, so here goes. Chris Boucher, who wrote this story, was the script editor of Blake's 7, and went on to write lots of fabulously bitchy dialog over Blake's 7's four seasons. Borg is played by Brian Croucher, who played Travis in Blake's 7 Season 2, and Miles Fothergill, who played camp newsreader robot SV7, played some guy in the Blake's 7 episode The Web.

    Fans of doing your hair and makeup in preparation for your big villain moment will enjoy Cancer in the Blake's 7 Season 4 episode Assassin.

    Fans of the worst atrocities in human history will enjoy this amazing video of Wonder Woman riding a skateboard.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll make snide remarks about the inverse ratio between the size of your mouth and the size of your brain.

    Bondfinger

    Check out our commentaries on the first three Bond films, Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 47: So Very Sexless

    4 October 2015 (9:44am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 33 minutes and 35 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, Flight Through Entirety is conducting a weird experiment in eugenics to create the perfect race of Doctor Who podcasters. And so Brendan's fake tan is orange, Nathan is wearing turquoise nappies and Todd's face has been carved into the side of a mountain. That's right, it's time for The Face of Evil.

    Buy the story!

    The Face of Evil was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Sharon Davies from Blackcastle was a companion of the Doctor in a series of comic strips from Doctor Who Magazine.

    If you want to hear more about James Bond and Honey Ryder, you should listen to the Bondfinger commentary on Dr. No. It's, you know, hilarious.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll tinker with your laptop until Microsoft Excel starts to believe that it's Pamela Salem.

    Bondfinger

    Check out our commentaries on the first three Bond films, Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • So Very Sexless

    4 October 2015 (9:44am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 33 minutes and 35 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, Flight Through Entirety is conducting a weird experiment in eugenics to create the perfect race of Doctor Who podcasters. And so Brendan's fake tan is orange, Nathan is wearing turquoise nappies and Todd's face has been carved into the side of a mountain. That's right, it's time for The Face of Evil.

    Buy the story!

    The Face of Evil was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Sharon Davies from Blackcastle was a companion of the Doctor in a series of comic strips from Doctor Who Magazine.

    If you want to hear more about James Bond and Honey Ryder, you should listen to the Bondfinger commentary on Dr. No. It's, you know, hilarious.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll tinker with your laptop until Microsoft Excel starts to believe that it's Pamela Salem.

    Bondfinger

    Check out our commentaries on the first three Bond films, Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 47 So Very Sexless

    4 October 2015 (9:44am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 33 minutes and 35 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, Flight Through Entirety is conducting a weird experiment in eugenics to create the perfect race of Doctor Who podcasters. And so Brendan's fake tan is orange, Nathan is wearing turquoise nappies and Todd's face has been carved into the side of a mountain. That's right, it's time for The Face of Evil.

    Buy the story!

    The Face of Evil was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Sharon Davies from Blackcastle was a companion of the Doctor in a series of comic strips from Doctor Who Magazine.

    If you want to hear more about James Bond and Honey Ryder, you should listen to the Bondfinger commentary on Dr. No. It's, you know, hilarious.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll tinker with your laptop until Microsoft Excel starts to believe that it's Pamela Salem.

    Bondfinger

    Check out our commentaries on the first three Bond films, Goldfinger (1964), From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on our website, as well as on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 46: A Hookah in the TARDIS

    27 September 2015 (9:21am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 43 minutes and 39 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Where has the magic of Doctor Who gone? It's the first time we've been back to Gallifrey since the last time, Todd is cross, and Mary Whitehouse is furious. It's time for The Deadly Assassin!

    Buy the story!

    The Deadly Assassin was released on DVD in 2009. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    It's impossible to understand the negative fanboy reception of this story without reading Jan Vincent-Rudski's review of this story. There's a video version of this review on YouTube.

    You can find Jan Vincent-Rudski's review in License Denied, edited by Paul Cornell, which is well worth a look. It includes Gareth Roberts's defence of the Graham Williams Era, which Nathan thinks is utterly brilliant, of course.

    The Manchurian Candidate (1962) tells the story of someone brainwashed into committing a terrible political assassination. Which really has nothing to do with The Deadly Assassin.

    Fans of things much less relevant to this story will enjoy Geordie LaForge trying to assassinate some Romulan guy in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode The Mind's Eye).

    Nathan is hugely embarrassed about not recognising Runcible the fatuous as Shakespeare in The Chase.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll stick you in a Doctor Who story with no companion apart from a talking cabbage perched on your shoulder. Which would just serve you right.

    Bondfinger

    We recorded our commentary podcast episode for Goldfinger mere moments ago, so keep an eye out for its release in the next week or so on Bondfinger. We have already done two commentaries: From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 46 A Hookah in the TARDIS

    27 September 2015 (9:21am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 22 minutes and 28 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Where has the magic of Doctor Who gone? It's the first time we've been back to Gallifrey since the last time, Todd is cross, and Mary Whitehouse is furious. It's time for The Deadly Assassin!

    Buy the story!

    The Deadly Assassin was released on DVD in 2009. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    It's impossible to understand the negative fanboy reception of this story without reading Jan Vincent-Rudski's review of this story. There's a video version of this review on YouTube.

    You can find Jan Vincent-Rudski's review in License Denied, edited by Paul Cornell, which is well worth a look. It includes Gareth Roberts's defence of the Graham Williams Era, which Nathan thinks is utterly brilliant, of course.

    The Manchurian Candidate (1962) tells the story of someone brainwashed into committing a terrible political assassination. Which really has nothing to do with The Deadly Assassin.

    Fans of things much less relevant to this story will enjoy Geordie LaForge trying to assassinate some Romulan guy in [the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode The Mind's Eye](http://en.memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/The_Mind's_Eye_(episode)).

    Nathan is hugely embarrassed about not recognising Runcible the fatuous as Shakespeare in The Chase.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll stick you in a Doctor Who story with no companion apart from a talking cabbage perched on your shoulder. Which would just serve you right.

    Bondfinger

    We recorded our commentary podcast episode for Goldfinger mere moments ago, so keep an eye out for its release in the next week or so on Bondfinger. We have already done two commentaries: From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • A Hookah in the TARDIS

    27 September 2015 (9:21am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 43 minutes and 39 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Where has the magic of Doctor Who gone? It's the first time we've been back to Gallifrey since the last time, Todd is cross, and Mary Whitehouse is furious. It's time for The Deadly Assassin!

    Buy the story!

    The Deadly Assassin was released on DVD in 2009. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    It's impossible to understand the negative fanboy reception of this story without reading Jan Vincent-Rudski's review of this story. There's a video version of this review on YouTube.

    You can find Jan Vincent-Rudski's review in License Denied, edited by Paul Cornell, which is well worth a look. It includes Gareth Roberts's defence of the Graham Williams Era, which Nathan thinks is utterly brilliant, of course.

    The Manchurian Candidate (1962) tells the story of someone brainwashed into committing a terrible political assassination. Which really has nothing to do with The Deadly Assassin.

    Fans of things much less relevant to this story will enjoy Geordie LaForge trying to assassinate some Romulan guy in [the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode The Mind's Eye](http://en.memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/The_Mind's_Eye_(episode)).

    Nathan is hugely embarrassed about not recognising Runcible the fatuous as Shakespeare in The Chase.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll stick you in a Doctor Who story with no companion apart from a talking cabbage perched on your shoulder. Which would just serve you right.

    Bondfinger

    We recorded our commentary podcast episode for Goldfinger mere moments ago, so keep an eye out for its release in the next week or so on Bondfinger. We have already done two commentaries: From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Not Sufficiently Executed Enough

    20 September 2015 (12:00am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 33 minutes and 43 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's time to bid a fond farewell to Lis Sladen as Sarah Jane Smith, and what better way to do that than blowing her up, hypnotising her, sticking her in an exploding nuclear reactor and dangling her over the edge of a precipice in The Hand of Fear? Till we meet again, Sarah.

    Buy the story!

    The Hand of Fear was released on DVD way back in 2006. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Fans of Bob Baker and Dave Martin's tendency to run out of ideas will enjoy K9 and the Time Trap, one of four K9 adventure books written by Dave Martin and published in 1980.

    Here's a picture of Judith Paris playing Elizabeth Siddal in Ken Russell's Dante's Inferno (1967).

    Florana is the beautiful planet that Pertwee persuaded Sarah to visit on holiday at the end of Invasion of the Dinosaurs.

    Outland (2012) is a six-part ABC comedy series written by John Richards and Adam Richard, about a group of gay SF fans, full to the brim of hilarious Doctor Who references. John Richards is also one of the hosts of the Splendid Chaps podcast, which reflected on the history of Doctor Who in the lead-up to the 50th anniversary.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll drop you off in a street somewhere in Aberdeen with nothing but a stuffed owl and a labrador for company.

    Bondfinger

    The Flight Through Entirety vanity James Bond project continues with Bondfinger, our commentary podcast on the James Bond films. We have already done two commentaries: From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962), with more on the way. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news -- including an upcoming commentary on Goldfinger early next month -- on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 45 Not Sufficiently Executed Enough

    20 September 2015 (12:00am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 33 minutes and 43 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's time to bid a fond farewell to Lis Sladen as Sarah Jane Smith, and what better way to do that than blowing her up, hypnotising her, sticking her in an exploding nuclear reactor and dangling her over the edge of a precipice in The Hand of Fear? Till we meet again, Sarah.

    Buy the story!

    The Hand of Fear was released on DVD way back in 2006. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Fans of Bob Baker and Dave Martin's tendency to run out of ideas will enjoy K9 and the Time Trap, one of four K9 adventure books written by Dave Martin and published in 1980.

    Here's a picture of Judith Paris playing Elizabeth Siddal in Ken Russell's Dante's Inferno (1967).

    Florana is the beautiful planet that Pertwee persuaded Sarah to visit on holiday at the end of Invasion of the Dinosaurs.

    Outland (2012) is a six-part ABC comedy series written by John Richards and Adam Richard, about a group of gay SF fans, full to the brim of hilarious Doctor Who references. John Richards is also one of the hosts of the Splendid Chaps podcast, which reflected on the history of Doctor Who in the lead-up to the 50th anniversary.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll drop you off in a street somewhere in Aberdeen with nothing but a stuffed owl and a labrador for company.

    Bondfinger

    The Flight Through Entirety vanity James Bond project continues with Bondfinger, our commentary podcast on the James Bond films. We have already done two commentaries: From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962), with more on the way. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news -- including an upcoming commentary on Goldfinger early next month -- on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 45: Not Sufficiently Executed Enough

    20 September 2015 (12:00am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 33 minutes and 43 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's time to bid a fond farewell to Lis Sladen as Sarah Jane Smith, and what better way to do that than blowing her up, hypnotising her, sticking her in an exploding nuclear reactor and dangling her over the edge of a precipice in The Hand of Fear? Till we meet again, Sarah.

    Buy the story!

    The Hand of Fear was released on DVD way back in 2006. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Fans of Bob Baker and Dave Martin's tendency to run out of ideas will enjoy K9 and the Time Trap, one of four K9 adventure books written by Dave Martin and published in 1980.

    Here's a picture of Judith Paris playing Elizabeth Siddal in Ken Russell's Dante's Inferno (1967).

    Florana is the beautiful planet that Pertwee persuaded Sarah to visit on holiday at the end of Invasion of the Dinosaurs.

    Outland (2012) is a six-part ABC comedy series written by John Richards and Adam Richard, about a group of gay SF fans, full to the brim of hilarious Doctor Who references. John Richards is also one of the hosts of the Splendid Chaps podcast, which reflected on the history of Doctor Who in the lead-up to the 50th anniversary.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll drop you off in a street somewhere in Aberdeen with nothing but a stuffed owl and a labrador for company.

    Bondfinger

    The Flight Through Entirety vanity James Bond project continues with Bondfinger, our commentary podcast on the James Bond films. We have already done two commentaries: From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962), with more on the way. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news -- including an upcoming commentary on Goldfinger early next month -- on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 44 A Fabulous Beard

    13 September 2015 (12:00am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 31 minutes and 34 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Well, Todd's enthusiastic, Brendan's cheerful and Nathan just wishes there was a Sontaran involved. We're off to the Duchy of San Martino in Wales, where cliched but gorgeously-designed things are afoot in The Masque of Mandragora.

    Watch the show

    The Masque of Mandragora was released on DVD in 2010. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Famously, the location work for this story was done in Portmeirion in Wales, which is a tourist thing built last century in the style of an Italian village. It's probably most famous as the location of Patrick McGoohan's cult classic The Prisoner (1967). Which is really, really worth watching. You can book your stay in one of Portmeirion's self-catering villas here, but watch out for bouncing weather ballons.

    The BBC Television Shakespeare ran from 1978 to 1984 and included adaptations of all of Shakespeare's plays. Yes, even Pericles, Prince of Tyre. It was almost completely studio-bound, with sets much like those created by Barry Newbery for Masque. The Wikipedia article is exhaustingly detailed.

    Quentin Crisp was a famous twentieth-century English homosexualist and author, made famous by (among other things) his portrayal by Doctor Who's very own John Hurt in The Naked Civil Servant (1975), a TV movie adaptation of his biography, produced by Verity Lambert. Fancy!

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll give you a blank look.

    Bondfinger

    If you're enjoying your flight, why not check out Bondfinger, our commentary podcast on the James Bond films? There are two commentaries so far: From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962), with more on the way. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • A Fabulous Beard

    13 September 2015 (12:00am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 31 minutes and 34 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Well, Todd's enthusiastic, Brendan's cheerful and Nathan just wishes there was a Sontaran involved. We're off to the Duchy of San Martino in Wales, where cliched but gorgeously-designed things are afoot in The Masque of Mandragora.

    Watch the show

    The Masque of Mandragora was released on DVD in 2010. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Famously, the location work for this story was done in Portmeirion in Wales, which is a tourist thing built last century in the style of an Italian village. It's probably most famous as the location of Patrick McGoohan's cult classic The Prisoner (1967). Which is really, really worth watching. You can book your stay in one of Portmeirion's self-catering villas here, but watch out for bouncing weather ballons.

    The BBC Television Shakespeare ran from 1978 to 1984 and included adaptations of all of Shakespeare's plays. Yes, even Pericles, Prince of Tyre. It was almost completely studio-bound, with sets much like those created by Barry Newbery for Masque. The Wikipedia article is exhaustingly detailed.

    Quentin Crisp was a famous twentieth-century English homosexualist and author, made famous by (among other things) his portrayal by Doctor Who's very own John Hurt in The Naked Civil Servant (1975), a TV movie adaptation of his biography, produced by Verity Lambert. Fancy!

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll give you a blank look.

    Bondfinger

    If you're enjoying your flight, why not check out Bondfinger, our commentary podcast on the James Bond films? There are two commentaries so far: From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962), with more on the way. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 44: A Fabulous Beard

    13 September 2015 (12:00am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 31 minutes and 34 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Well, Todd's enthusiastic, Brendan's cheerful and Nathan just wishes there was a Sontaran involved. We're off to the Duchy of San Martino in Wales, where cliched but gorgeously-designed things are afoot in The Masque of Mandragora.

    Watch the show

    The Masque of Mandragora was released on DVD in 2010. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Famously, the location work for this story was done in Portmeirion in Wales, which is a tourist thing built last century in the style of an Italian village. It's probably most famous as the location of Patrick McGoohan's cult classic The Prisoner (1967). Which is really, really worth watching. You can book your stay in one of Portmeirion's self-catering villas here, but watch out for bouncing weather ballons.

    The BBC Television Shakespeare ran from 1978 to 1984 and included adaptations of all of Shakespeare's plays. Yes, even Pericles, Prince of Tyre. It was almost completely studio-bound, with sets much like those created by Barry Newbery for Masque. The Wikipedia article is exhaustingly detailed.

    Quentin Crisp was a famous twentieth-century English homosexualist and author, made famous by (among other things) his portrayal by Doctor Who's very own John Hurt in The Naked Civil Servant (1975), a TV movie adaptation of his biography, produced by Verity Lambert. Fancy!

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll give you a blank look.

    Bondfinger

    If you're enjoying your flight, why not check out Bondfinger, our commentary podcast on the James Bond films? There are two commentaries so far: From Russia With Love (1963), and Dr. No (1962), with more on the way. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Sexiest Exposition Trope

    6 September 2015 (3:40am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 35 minutes and 31 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Brendan, Richard and Nathan enjoy the rare treat of watching a really great episode of 60s television: it's one of Robert Banks Stewart's sources for The Seeds of Doom: a 1966 episode of The Avengers called Man-Eater of Surrey Green.

    Watch the show

    You can watch Man-Eater of Surrey Green in its entirety here.

    Notes and links

    If you want to find out all there is to know about The Avengers, take a look here at Avengers Forever.

    Future Steed sidekick Linda Thorson appears as a Cardassian in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode [The Chase]( http://en.memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/The_Chase_(episode)), which is otherwise pretty terrible, to be honest.

    Joanna Lumley (eventually) played the Doctor in Steven Moffat's The Curse of Fatal Death, a Comic Relief special broadcast in 1999.

    In the Thin Man films, including Thin Man (1934) and its five sequels, a detective and his wife, played by William Powell and Myrna Loy, have a lovely time solving mysteries together. It's terribly good, apparently.

    We'll be back next week with The Masque of Mandragora.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll take a break from podcasting about your favourite TV show to discuss something you've never actually heard of.

    From Russia With Love

    In the latest episode of Bondfinger, Brendan, Richard and James discuss the second official Bond film: From Russia With Love (1963). You can still hear our first episode here. And you can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 43 Sexiest Exposition Trope

    6 September 2015 (3:40am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 35 minutes and 31 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Brendan, Richard and Nathan enjoy the rare treat of watching a really great episode of 60s television: it's one of Robert Banks Stewart's sources for The Seeds of Doom: a 1966 episode of The Avengers called Man-Eater of Surrey Green.

    Watch the show

    You can watch Man-Eater of Surrey Green in its entirety here.

    Notes and links

    If you want to find out all there is to know about The Avengers, take a look here at Avengers Forever.

    Future Steed sidekick Linda Thorson appears as a Cardassian in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode [The Chase]( http://en.memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/The_Chase_(episode)), which is otherwise pretty terrible, to be honest.

    Joanna Lumley (eventually) played the Doctor in Steven Moffat's The Curse of Fatal Death, a Comic Relief special broadcast in 1999.

    In the Thin Man films, including Thin Man (1934) and its five sequels, a detective and his wife, played by William Powell and Myrna Loy, have a lovely time solving mysteries together. It's terribly good, apparently.

    We'll be back next week with The Masque of Mandragora.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll take a break from podcasting about your favourite TV show to discuss something you've never actually heard of.

    From Russia With Love

    In the latest episode of Bondfinger, Brendan, Richard and James discuss the second official Bond film: From Russia With Love (1963). You can still hear our first episode here. And you can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 43: Sexiest Exposition Trope

    6 September 2015 (3:40am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 3 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Brendan, Richard and Nathan enjoy the rare treat of watching a really great episode of 60s television: it's one of Robert Banks Stewart's sources for The Seeds of Doom: a 1966 episode of The Avengers called Man-Eater of Surrey Green.

    Watch the show

    You can watch Man-Eater of Surrey Green in its entirety here.

    Notes and links

    If you want to find out all there is to know about The Avengers, take a look here at Avengers Forever.

    Future Steed sidekick Linda Thorson appears as a Cardassian in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode The Chase, which is otherwise pretty terrible, to be honest.

    Joanna Lumley (eventually) played the Doctor in Steven Moffat's The Curse of Fatal Death, a Comic Relief special broadcast in 1999.

    In the Thin Man films, including Thin Man (1934) and its five sequels, a detective and his wife, played by William Powell and Myrna Loy, have a lovely time solving mysteries together. It's terribly good, apparently.

    We'll be back next week with The Masque of Mandragora.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll take a break from podcasting about your favourite TV show to discuss something you've never actually heard of.

    From Russia With Love

    In the latest episode of Bondfinger, Brendan, Richard and James discuss the second official Bond film: From Russia With Love (1963). You can still hear our first episode here. And you can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Playing It Straight

    30 August 2015 (7:23am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 46 minutes and 38 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's time to put down those bonsai pruners and catch the first helicopter to Antarctica, as we discuss the final story of Season 13, that florid, fecund, flexuous and frutescent classic, The Seeds of Doom.

    Buy the story!

    The Seeds of Doom was released on DVD in 2010 and 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    The Seeds of Doom came 20th out of 241 stories in Doctor Who Magazine's The First Fifty Years Poll in 2013. You can see the full list of results here.

    However, the story isn't universally loved. In About Time Volume 4, Tat Wood names it as his least favourite story of Tom's first six seasons (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). You can read Elizabeth Sandifer's fairly negative review of the story here.

    Fans of people slowly being taken over by plants will enjoy the film Creepshow (1982), in which Stephen King himself is taken over by some lush, aggressive vegetation.

    The Italian Job (1969) stars Michael Caine, Noel Coward and Benny Hill. It looks amazing. And our very own Harrison Chase, Tony Beckley, shows his extensive range by playing a character called Camp Freddie.

    Here's our usual list of films plundered in the making of this story: Ice Station Zebra (1968), an espionage thriller set on a base in the Arctic, Day of the Triffids (1963), in which giant plant monsters take over the world after most of humanity is blinded, and the brilliant Howard Hawks film The Thing from Another World (1963) in which a plant Frankenstein's monster thing attacks yet another base in the Arctic.

    And of course, there's the Season 4 Avengers episode, The Man-Eater of Surrey Green (1965). More of which later.

    Nathan explains his personal experience with the idea of Guns and Frocks in Doctor Who in the only post on his blog of the same name.

    Can we possibly have failed to mention H P Lovecraft before? The Hinchcliffe Era is massively indebted to his SF/Horror stories, in which the universe is haunted by ancient evil gods from beyond the dawn of time. You can get a free ebook of all of his fiction here.

    Picks of the week Brendan

    Brendan's pick is Refuge (2015), a short film set on an alien planet, shot entirely in moonlight. You can watch it here, but be careful: it's a bit scary.

    Nathan

    The Doctor Who Magazine app for the iPad (and iPhone). Issue 443 of the magazine contains an interview with The Seeds of Doom author Robert Banks Stewart.

    Richard

    Gods and Monsters (1998), which we mentioned last week: a film about James Whale, who directed Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). It stars Brendan Fraser, Ian McKellen and our very own Pamela Salem.

    Next week

    Next week, we're taking a break from our usual schedule to watch one of the inspirations for The Seeds of Doom: the Avengers episode The Man-Eater of Surrey Green. Your homework is to watch it in preparation. You can find the entire episode here.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll forget to pay you for your lovely painting of the Fritillaria meleagris that we're storing in the boot of our Daimler.

    Next weekend: Istanbul

    Keep an eye our for the next episode of Bondfinger, which will be released next weekend, and which features Brendan, Richard and James talking about From Russia With Love (1963). You can hear our first episode here. And you can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 42 Playing It Straight

    30 August 2015 (7:23am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 46 minutes and 38 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's time to put down those bonsai pruners and catch the first helicopter to Antarctica, as we discuss the final story of Season 13, that florid, fecund, flexuous and frutescent classic, The Seeds of Doom.

    Buy the story!

    The Seeds of Doom was released on DVD in 2010 and 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    The Seeds of Doom came 20th out of 241 stories in Doctor Who Magazine's The First Fifty Years Poll in 2013. You can see the full list of results here.

    However, the story isn't universally loved. In About Time Volume 4, Tat Wood names it as his least favourite story of Tom's first six seasons (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). You can read Philip Sandifer's fairly negative review of the story here.

    Fans of people slowly being taken over by plants will enjoy the film Creepshow (1982), in which Stephen King himself is taken over by some lush, aggressive vegetation.

    The Italian Job (1969) stars Michael Caine, Noel Coward and Benny Hill. It looks amazing. And our very own Harrison Chase, Tony Beckley, shows his extensive range by playing a character called Camp Freddie.

    Here's our usual list of films plundered in the making of this story: Ice Station Zebra (1968), an espionage thriller set on a base in the Arctic, Day of the Triffids (1963), in which giant plant monsters take over the world after most of humanity is blinded, and the brilliant Howard Hawks film The Thing from Another World (1963) in which a plant Frankenstein's monster thing attacks yet another base in the Arctic.

    And of course, there's the Season 4 Avengers episode, The Man-Eater of Surrey Green (1965). More of which later.

    Nathan explains his personal experience with the idea of Guns and Frocks in Doctor Who in the only post on his blog of the same name.

    Can we possibly have failed to mention H P Lovecraft before? The Hinchcliffe Era is massively indebted to his SF/Horror stories, in which the universe is haunted by ancient evil gods from beyond the dawn of time. You can get a free ebook of all of his fiction here.

    Picks of the week Brendan

    Brendan's pick is Refuge (2015), a short film set on an alien planet, shot entirely in moonlight. You can watch it here, but be careful: it's a bit scary.

    Nathan

    The Doctor Who Magazine app for the iPad (and iPhone). Issue 443 of the magazine contains an interview with The Seeds of Doom author Robert Banks Stewart.

    Richard

    Gods and Monsters (1998), which we mentioned last week: a film about James Whale, who directed Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). It stars Brendan Fraser, Ian McKellen and our very own Pamela Salem.

    Next week

    Next week, we're taking a break from our usual schedule to watch one of the inspirations for The Seeds of Doom: the Avengers episode The Man-Eater of Surrey Green. Your homework is to watch it in preparation. You can find the entire episode here.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll forget to pay you for your lovely painting of the Fritillaria meleagris that we're storing in the boot of our Daimler.

    Next weekend: Istanbul

    Keep an eye our for the next episode of Bondfinger, which will be released next weekend, and which features Brendan, Richard and James talking about From Russia With Love (1963). You can hear our first episode here. And you can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 42: Playing It Straight

    30 August 2015 (7:23am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 46 minutes and 38 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    It's time to put down those bonsai pruners and catch the first helicopter to Antarctica, as we discuss the final story of Season 13, that florid, fecund, flexuous and frutescent classic, The Seeds of Doom.

    Buy the story!

    The Seeds of Doom was released on DVD in 2010 and 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    The Seeds of Doom came 20th out of 241 stories in Doctor Who Magazine's The First Fifty Years Poll in 2013. You can see the full list of results here.

    However, the story isn't universally loved. In About Time Volume 4, Tat Wood names it as his least favourite story of Tom's first six seasons (Amazon US) (Amazon UK). You can read Philip Sandifer's fairly negative review of the story here.

    Fans of people slowly being taken over by plants will enjoy the film Creepshow (1982), in which Stephen King himself is taken over by some lush, aggressive vegetation.

    The Italian Job (1969) stars Michael Caine, Noel Coward and Benny Hill. It looks amazing. And our very own Harrison Chase, Tony Beckley, shows his extensive range by playing a character called Camp Freddie.

    Here's our usual list of films plundered in the making of this story: Ice Station Zebra (1968), an espionage thriller set on a base in the Arctic, Day of the Triffids (1963), in which giant plant monsters take over the world after most of humanity is blinded, and the brilliant Howard Hawks film The Thing from Another World (1963) in which a plant Frankenstein's monster thing attacks yet another base in the Arctic.

    And of course, there's the Season 4 Avengers episode, The Man-Eater of Surrey Green (1965). More of which later.

    Nathan explains his personal experience with the idea of Guns and Frocks in Doctor Who in the only post on his blog of the same name.

    Can we possibly have failed to mention H P Lovecraft before? The Hinchcliffe Era is massively indebted to his SF/Horror stories, in which the universe is haunted by ancient evil gods from beyond the dawn of time. You can get a free ebook of all of his fiction here.

    Picks of the week Brendan

    Brendan's pick is Refuge (2015), a short film set on an alien planet, shot entirely in moonlight. You can watch it here, but be careful: it's a bit scary.

    Nathan

    The Doctor Who Magazine app for the iPad (and iPhone). Issue 443 of the magazine contains an interview with The Seeds of Doom author Robert Banks Stewart.

    Richard

    Gods and Monsters (1998), which we mentioned last week: a film about James Whale, who directed  Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). It stars Brendan Fraser, Ian McKellen and our very own Pamela Salem.

    Next week

    Next week, we're taking a break from our usual schedule to watch one of the inspirations for The Seeds of Doom: the Avengers episode The Man-Eater of Surrey Green. Your homework is to watch it in preparation. You can find the entire episode here.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll forget to pay you for your lovely painting of the Fritillaria meleagris that we're storing in the boot of our Daimler.

    Next weekend: Istanbul

    Keep an eye our for the next episode of Bondfinger, which will be released next weekend, and which features Brendan, Richard and James talking about From Russia With Love (1963). You can hear our first episode here. And you can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Philip Madoc in Fishnets

    23 August 2015 (8:02am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 0 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, we're off to the planet Karn for wine, cheese and cyanide with Dr Mehendri Solon and his pet brain-in-a-jar Morbius. And Sarah Jane Smith has never had so much fun!

    Buy the story!

    The Brain of Morbius was released on DVD in 2008. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    As usual, the first thing we do with a Hinchcliffe story is to work out which classic horror films it's, er, paying homage to. This time, it's the films of James Whale -- Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). James Whale's own story is told in Gods and Monsters (1998), where he is played by Doctor Who's very own Sir Ian McKellen. (He did a voiceover in The Snowmen. That totally counts.)

    Pieter Bruegel painted three pictures of the Tower of Babel, all of which look very much like Solon's castle.

    Fans of the hilarious way Nathan continually mixes up the names of Doctor Who stories will enjoy how, in his incisive analysis of this season's terrible flaws, he manages to refer to The Android Invasion as Invasion of the Dinosaurs. And Brendan will try and muscle in on the action later on by calling The Seeds of Doom The Seeds of Death. Aren't we silly?

    For once, Elizabeth Sandifer is not actually responsible for the rule Nathan quotes about canon: it's part of this brilliant anti-canon rant on the sadly defunct Teatime Brutality blog.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll come round to your house and challenge you to a mind-bending contest. We have all the apparatus here, after all.

    The Death of Dr. No

    If you've been affected by issues raised in this podcast, please contact our new project Bondfinger, which currently just consists of a single a commentary track on Dr. No (1962), with more to come early in September. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 41 Philip Madoc in Fishnets

    23 August 2015 (8:02am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 0 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, we're off to the planet Karn for wine, cheese and cyanide with Dr Mehendri Solon and his pet brain-in-a-jar Morbius. And Sarah Jane Smith has never had so much fun!

    Buy the story!

    The Brain of Morbius was released on DVD in 2008. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    As usual, the first thing we do with a Hinchcliffe story is to work out which classic horror films it's, er, paying homage to. This time, it's the films of James Whale -- Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). James Whale's own story is told in Gods and Monsters (1998), where he is played by Doctor Who's very own Sir Ian McKellen. (He did a voiceover in The Snowmen. That totally counts.)

    Pieter Bruegel painted three pictures of the Tower of Babel, all of which look very much like Solon's castle.

    Fans of the hilarious way Nathan continually mixes up the names of Doctor Who stories will enjoy how, in his incisive analysis of this season's terrible flaws, he manages to refer to The Android Invasion as Invasion of the Dinosaurs. And Brendan will try and muscle in on the action later on by calling The Seeds of Doom The Seeds of Death. Aren't we silly?

    For once, Philip Sandifer is not actually responsible for the rule Nathan quotes about canon: it's part of this brilliant anti-canon rant on the sadly defunct Teatime Brutality blog.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll come round to your house and challenge you to a mind-bending contest. We have all the apparatus here, after all.

    The Death of Dr. No

    If you've been affected by issues raised in this podcast, please contact our new project Bondfinger, which currently just consists of a single a commentary track on Dr. No (1962), with more to come early in September. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 41: Philip Madoc in Fishnets

    23 August 2015 (8:02am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 0 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, we're off to the planet Karn for wine, cheese and cyanide with Dr Mehendri Solon and his pet brain-in-a-jar Morbius. And Sarah Jane Smith has never had so much fun!

    Buy the story!

    The Brain of Morbius was released on DVD in 2008. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    As usual, the first thing we do with a Hinchcliffe story is to work out which classic horror films it's, er, paying homage to. This time, it's the films of James Whale -- Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). James Whale's own story is told in Gods and Monsters (1998), where he is played by Doctor Who's very own Sir Ian McKellen. (He did a voiceover in The Snowmen. That totally counts.)

    Pieter Bruegel painted three pictures of the Tower of Babel, all of which look very much like Solon's castle.

    Fans of the hilarious way Nathan continually mixes up the names of Doctor Who stories will enjoy how, in his incisive analysis of this season's terrible flaws, he manages to refer to The Android Invasion as Invasion of the Dinosaurs. And Brendan will try and muscle in on the action later on by calling The Seeds of Doom The Seeds of Death. Aren't we silly?

    For once, Philip Sandifer is not actually responsible for the rule Nathan quotes about canon: it's part of this brilliant anti-canon rant on the sadly defunct Teatime Brutality blog.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll come round to your house and challenge you to a mind-bending contest. We have all the apparatus here, after all.

    The Death of Dr. No

    If you've been affected by issues raised in this podcast, please contact our new project Bondfinger, which currently just consists of a single a commentary track on Dr. No (1962), with more to come early in September. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 40: Just Full of Nazis

    16 August 2015 (12:59am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 12 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Harry and Benton are back, but no one cares, as robot replicas of Brendan, Nathan and Richard trudge through Terry Nation's penultimate Doctor Who story, The Android Invasion.

    Buy the story!

    The Android Invasion was released on DVD in 2012. In the UK and Australia, it was released as part of the UNIT Files box set, along with Invasion of the Dinosaurs (Amazon UK). It was released on its own in the US (Amazon US).

    Notes and links

    We're going to put you through a whole lot of terrible vintage televsion in this episode's shownotes, so are you sitting comfortably? Then let's begin.

    Here's Patrick Macnee's John Steed standing in front of the Cock Inn from The New Avengers title sequence. Ooh-er!

    Nathan's phrase "robot replica" was shamelessly lifted from an episode of Steven Moffat's Press Gang called UnXpected, in which the eponymous gang encounter the fictional hero of a terrible, terrible 70s science fiction TV series. Which is probably just a coincidence.

    Fans of actual robot replicas will enjoy The Stepford Wives (1976) and Westworld (1973).

    Such fans will also enjoy The Avengers episode The Hour that Never Was, not because of robot replicas, because there aren't any, but because it's just superb.

    And such fans will be completely overwhelmed by these Six Million Dollar Man episodes: Steve Austin fights a robot replica of someone else in Day of the Robot, and there's a robot woman with a Sarah-from-the-Part-2-cliffhanger face in the Bionic Woman crossover Kill Oscar.

    Milton Johns talks about Guy Crayford's eyepatch in this BBC interview.

    Fans of robot replicas of English villages will enjoy the Danger Man episode Colony Three.

    No one at all will enjoy Terry Nation's first Avengers episode Invasion of the Earthmen, which was described by the Avengers Forever website as "one of the worst classics Avengers episodes of all time".

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and you can now welcome Richard to Twitter as @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll, I don't know, force you to watch The Android Invasion again?

    Meanwhile, at Universal Exports...

    Fans of Flight Through Entirety will enjoy our new project Bondfinger, which launched earlier this month with a commentary track on Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 40 Just Full of Nazis

    16 August 2015 (12:59am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 12 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Harry and Benton are back, but no one cares, as robot replicas of Brendan, Nathan and Richard trudge through Terry Nation's penultimate Doctor Who story, The Android Invasion.

    Buy the story!

    The Android Invasion was released on DVD in 2012. In the UK and Australia, it was released as part of the UNIT Files box set, along with Invasion of the Dinosaurs (Amazon UK). It was released on its own in the US (Amazon US).

    Notes and links

    We're going to put you through a whole lot of terrible vintage televsion in this episode's shownotes, so are you sitting comfortably? Then let's begin.

    Here's Patrick Macnee's John Steed standing in front of the Cock Inn from The New Avengers title sequence. Ooh-er!

    Nathan's phrase "robot replica" was shamelessly lifted from an episode of Steven Moffat's Press Gang called UnXpected, in which the eponymous gang encounter the fictional hero of a terrible, terrible 70s science fiction TV series. Which is probably just a coincidence.

    Fans of actual robot replicas will enjoy The Stepford Wives (1976) and Westworld (1973).

    Such fans will also enjoy The Avengers episode The Hour that Never Was, not because of robot replicas, because there aren't any, but because it's just superb.

    And such fans will be completely overwhelmed by these Six Million Dollar Man episodes: Steve Austin fights a robot replica of someone else in Day of the Robot, and there's a robot woman with a Sarah-from-the-Part-2-cliffhanger face in the Bionic Woman crossover Kill Oscar.

    Milton Johns talks about Guy Crayford's eyepatch in this BBC interview.

    Fans of robot replicas of English villages will enjoy the Danger Man episode Colony Three.

    No one at all will enjoy Terry Nation's first Avengers episode Invasion of the Earthmen, which was described by the Avengers Forever website as "one of the worst classics Avengers episodes of all time".

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and you can now welcome Richard to Twitter as @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll, I don't know, force you to watch The Android Invasion again?

    Meanwhile, at Universal Exports...

    Fans of Flight Through Entirety will enjoy our new project Bondfinger, which launched earlier this month with a commentary track on Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Just Full of Nazis

    16 August 2015 (12:59am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 37 minutes and 12 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Harry and Benton are back, but no one cares, as robot replicas of Brendan, Nathan and Richard trudge through Terry Nation's penultimate Doctor Who story, The Android Invasion.

    Buy the story!

    The Android Invasion was released on DVD in 2012. In the UK and Australia, it was released as part of the UNIT Files box set, along with Invasion of the Dinosaurs (Amazon UK). It was released on its own in the US (Amazon US).

    Notes and links

    We're going to put you through a whole lot of terrible vintage televsion in this episode's shownotes, so are you sitting comfortably? Then let's begin.

    Here's Patrick Macnee's John Steed standing in front of the Cock Inn from The New Avengers title sequence. Ooh-er!

    Nathan's phrase "robot replica" was shamelessly lifted from an episode of Steven Moffat's Press Gang called UnXpected, in which the eponymous gang encounter the fictional hero of a terrible, terrible 70s science fiction TV series. Which is probably just a coincidence.

    Fans of actual robot replicas will enjoy The Stepford Wives (1976) and Westworld (1973).

    Such fans will also enjoy The Avengers episode The Hour that Never Was, not because of robot replicas, because there aren't any, but because it's just superb.

    And such fans will be completely overwhelmed by these Six Million Dollar Man episodes: Steve Austin fights a robot replica of someone else in Day of the Robot, and there's a robot woman with a Sarah-from-the-Part-2-cliffhanger face in the Bionic Woman crossover Kill Oscar.

    Milton Johns talks about Guy Crayford's eyepatch in this BBC interview.

    Fans of robot replicas of English villages will enjoy the Danger Man episode Colony Three.

    No one at all will enjoy Terry Nation's first Avengers episode Invasion of the Earthmen, which was described by the Avengers Forever website as "one of the worst classics Avengers episodes of all time".

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and you can now welcome Richard to Twitter as @RichardLStone. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll, I don't know, force you to watch The Android Invasion again?

    Meanwhile, at Universal Exports...

    Fans of Flight Through Entirety will enjoy our new project Bondfinger, which launched earlier this month with a commentary track on Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 39 He's Always a Villain

    9 August 2015 (1:44am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 41 minutes and 35 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week we discuss Pyramids of Mars, a classic Hinchcliffe story that comes in the top ten in every reputable fan poll. Naturally enough, Nathan doesn't like it.

    Buy the story!

    Pyramids of Mars was released on DVD way back in 2004. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Well, it's a Hinchcliffe/Holmes story, so let's get the sources out of the way: The Riddle of the Sands (1903) by Erskine Childers is a rollicking adventure about an impeding German invasion, and The Secret Garden (1911) by Frances Hodgson Burnett is a beloved children's book about why doctors cannot be trusted.

    But that's not all. Not only do we famously have Hammer's Blood from the Mummy's Tomb (1971) as a major source, but Brendan also identifies Dr Phibes Rises Again! (1972).

    Michael Bilton's Collins the manservant impobably survives the conflagration in Part 4, and goes on many years later to do for Audrey fforbes-Hamilton in To The Manor Born (1979).

    Fans of both friction and lubrication will enjoy, among other things, the Journal of Tribology.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard's Twitter account has been locked in a pyramid for millenia with only robots, forcefields and deadly missiles for company. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll put on one of Victoria's old dresses and mock you gently behind your back.

    Of our own accord

    We've all been off to Jamaica with our good friend James: you can hear the results in the first episode of Bondfinger, a commentary track on Dr. No (1962). And you can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • He's Always a Villain

    9 August 2015 (1:44am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 41 minutes and 35 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week we discuss Pyramids of Mars, a classic Hinchcliffe story that comes in the top ten in every reputable fan poll. Naturally enough, Nathan doesn't like it.

    Buy the story!

    Pyramids of Mars was released on DVD way back in 2004. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Well, it's a Hinchcliffe/Holmes story, so let's get the sources out of the way: The Riddle of the Sands (1903) by Erskine Childers is a rollicking adventure about an impeding German invasion, and The Secret Garden (1911) by Frances Hodgson Burnett is a beloved children's book about why doctors cannot be trusted.

    But that's not all. Not only do we famously have Hammer's Blood from the Mummy's Tomb (1971) as a major source, but Brendan also identifies Dr Phibes Rises Again! (1972).

    Michael Bilton's Collins the manservant impobably survives the conflagration in Part 4, and goes on many years later to do for Audrey fforbes-Hamilton in To The Manor Born (1979).

    Fans of both friction and lubrication will enjoy, among other things, the Journal of Tribology.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard's Twitter account has been locked in a pyramid for millenia with only robots, forcefields and deadly missiles for company. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll put on one of Victoria's old dresses and mock you gently behind your back.

    Of our own accord

    We've all been off to Jamaica with our good friend James: you can hear the results in the first episode of Bondfinger, a commentary track on Dr. No (1962). And you can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 39: He's Always a Villain

    9 August 2015 (1:44am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 41 minutes and 35 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week we discuss Pyramids of Mars, a classic Hinchcliffe story that comes in the top ten in every reputable fan poll. Naturally enough, Nathan doesn't like it.

    Buy the story!

    Pyramids of Mars was released on DVD way back in 2004. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Well, it's a Hinchcliffe/Holmes story, so let's get the sources out of the way: The Riddle of the Sands (1903) by Erskine Childers is a rollicking adventure about an impeding German invasion, and The Secret Garden (1911) by Frances Hodgson Burnett is a beloved children's book about why doctors cannot be trusted.

    But that's not all. Not only do we famously have Hammer's Blood from the Mummy's Tomb (1971) as a major source, but Brendan also identifies Dr Phibes Rises Again! (1972).

    Michael Bilton's Collins the manservant impobably survives the conflagration in Part 4, and goes on many years later to do for Audrey fforbes-Hamilton in To The Manor Born (1979).

    Fans of both friction and lubrication will enjoy, among other things, the Journal of Tribology.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard's Twitter account has been locked in a pyramid for millenia with only robots, forcefields and deadly missiles for company. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll put on one of Victoria's old dresses and mock you gently behind your back.

    Of our own accord

    We've all been off to Jamaica with our good friend James: you can hear the results in the first episode of Bondfinger, a commentary track on Dr. No (1962). And you can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 38 Where's Spielberg?

    1 August 2015 (11:01pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 39 minutes and 52 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In a strange universe, in the distant future, the President, Vice-President and Treasurer of the Prentis Hancock Appreciation Society, Brendan, Richard and Nathan, meet to discuss shower curtains, detergent bottles and undeserved survival in Planet of Evil.

    Buy the stories!

    Planet of Evil was released on DVD in 2007/2008. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Richard and Brendan are quick to identify this story’s main sources: Howard Hawks’ The Thing From Another World (1951), Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) and Forbidden Planet (1956).

    In Stanislaw Lem’s [Solaris (1961)](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solaris_(novel)), the members of a scientific expedition are studied and psychologically traumatised by the sentient ocean of an alien planet.

    Ponti is played by Louis Mahoney, who also appears in Frontier in Space and Blink, but perhaps he is most famous as a doctor in the Fawlty Towers episode, The Germans.

    The Haunting of BBC Television Centre: can anyone explain the mysterious face that appears on the ship’s screen in Part 3 after the Doctor has fallen into the pond?

    Fans of the way Brendan’s mind works will enjoy this picture of a giant frog from Alex Kidd in Miracle World (1986), which looks eerily familiar. To him.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard’s Twitter account has fallen into a black pond full of antimatter. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we’ll sneak into your lunchbox and fill your thermos full of dry ice.

    Meanwhile, elsewhere on the internet...

    We’ve launched our new project, Bondfinger, with our first commentary on Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Where's Spielberg?

    1 August 2015 (11:01pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 39 minutes and 52 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In a strange universe, in the distant future, the President, Vice-President and Treasurer of the Prentis Hancock Appreciation Society, Brendan, Richard and Nathan, meet to discuss shower curtains, detergent bottles and undeserved survival in Planet of Evil.

    Buy the stories!

    Planet of Evil was released on DVD in 2007/2008. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Richard and Brendan are quick to identify this story’s main sources: Howard Hawks’ The Thing From Another World (1951), Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) and Forbidden Planet (1956).

    In Stanislaw Lem’s [Solaris (1961)](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solaris_(novel)), the members of a scientific expedition are studied and psychologically traumatised by the sentient ocean of an alien planet.

    Ponti is played by Louis Mahoney, who also appears in Frontier in Space and Blink, but perhaps he is most famous as a doctor in the Fawlty Towers episode, The Germans.

    The Haunting of BBC Television Centre: can anyone explain the mysterious face that appears on the ship’s screen in Part 3 after the Doctor has fallen into the pond?

    Fans of the way Brendan’s mind works will enjoy this picture of a giant frog from Alex Kidd in Miracle World (1986), which looks eerily familiar. To him.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard’s Twitter account has fallen into a black pond full of antimatter. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we’ll sneak into your lunchbox and fill your thermos full of dry ice.

    Meanwhile, elsewhere on the internet...

    We’ve launched our new project, Bondfinger, with our first commentary on Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • Episode 38: Where's Spielberg?

    1 August 2015 (11:01pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 39 minutes and 52 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    In a strange universe, in the distant future, the President, Vice-President and Treasurer of the Prentis Hancock Appreciation Society, Brendan, Richard and Nathan, meet to discuss shower curtains, detergent bottles and undeserved survival in Planet of Evil.

    Buy the stories!

    Planet of Evil was released on DVD in 2007/2008. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Notes and links

    Richard and Brendan are quick to identify this story's main sources: Howard Hawks' The Thing From Another World (1951), Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) and Forbidden Planet (1956).

    In Stanislaw Lem's Solaris (1961), the members of a scientific expedition are studied and psychologically traumatised by the sentient ocean of an alien planet.

    Ponti is played by Louis Mahoney, who also appears in Frontier in Space and Blink, but perhaps he is most famous as a doctor in the Fawlty Towers episode, The Germans.

    The Haunting of BBC Television Centre: can anyone explain the mysterious face that appears on the ship's screen in Part 3 after the Doctor has fallen into the pond?

    Fans of the way Brendan's mind works will enjoy this picture of a giant frog from Alex Kidd in Miracle World (1986), which looks eerily familiar. To him.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard's Twitter account has fallen into a black pond full of antimatter. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll sneak into your lunchbox and fill your thermos full of dry ice.

    Meanwhile, elsewhere on the internet...

    We've launched our new project, Bondfinger, with our first commentary on Dr. No (1962). You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.



  • A Shaved Mr Snuffleupagus

    25 July 2015 (11:32pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 36 minutes and 38 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, we're high in the misty Highlands, out by the purple islands, being attacked by Zygons, Scotland the Brave!

    Buy the stories!

    Terror of the Zygons was finally released on DVD in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Terrance Dicks's novelisation, Doctor Who and the Loch Ness Monster, was re-released to celebrate the 50th anniversary, and so it's still actually in print. Hooray! (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    A picture of Nessie's flipper was taken in 1972, and so Peter Scott called it Nessiteras rhombopteryx. Bless him.

    Fans of staggering up the beach will enjoy the the Avengers episode The Town of No Return.

    SEE! the Skarasen being milked on BBC America's TARDIS Index File.

    [The argonauts](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argonaut_(animal)) are a genus of Octopus (Argonauta sp.) whose males only ever mate once, for the most surprising reason.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard's just happy to see you. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll send Angus Ferguson McRanald round to your house to play the bagpipes and drastically lower your property prices.

    And coming on 1 August...

    Check out our new project: Bondfinger. You can keep up with all the news on Twitter and Facebook. One week to go!



  • Episode 37 A Shaved Mr Snuffleupagus

    25 July 2015 (11:32pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 36 minutes and 38 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, we're high in the misty Highlands, out by the purple islands, being attacked by Zygons, Scotland the Brave!

    Buy the stories!

    Terror of the Zygons was finally released on DVD in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Terrance Dicks's novelisation, Doctor Who and the Loch Ness Monster, was re-released to celebrate the 50th anniversary, and so it's still actually in print. Hooray! (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    A picture of Nessie's flipper was taken in 1972, and so Peter Scott called it Nessiteras rhombopteryx. Bless him.

    Fans of staggering up the beach will enjoy the the Avengers episode The Town of No Return.

    SEE! the Skarasen being milked on BBC America's TARDIS Index File.

    [The argonauts](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argonaut_(animal)) are a genus of Octopus (Argonauta sp.) whose males only ever mate once, for the most surprising reason.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard's just happy to see you. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll send Angus Ferguson McRanald round to your house to play the bagpipes and drastically lower your property prices.

    And coming on 1 August...

    Check out our new project: Bondfinger. You can keep up with all the news on Twitter and Facebook. One week to go!



  • Episode 37: A Shaved Mr Snuffleupagus

    25 July 2015 (11:32pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 36 minutes and 38 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, we're high in the misty Highlands, out by the purple islands, being attacked by Zygons, Scotland the Brave!

    Buy the stories!

    Terror of the Zygons was finally released on DVD in 2013. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Terrance Dicks's novelisation, Doctor Who and the Loch Ness Monster, was re-released to celebrate the 50th anniversary, and so it's still actually in print. Hooray! (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    A picture of Nessie's flipper was taken in 1972, and so Peter Scott called it Nessiteras rhombopteryx. Bless him.

    Fans of staggering up the beach will enjoy the the Avengers episode The Town of No Return.

    SEE! the Skarasen being milked on BBC America's TARDIS Index File.

    The argonauts are a genus of Octopus (Argonauta sp.) whose males only ever mate once, for the most surprising reason.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard's just happy to see you. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll send Angus Ferguson McRanald round to your house to play the bagpipes and drastically lower your property prices.

    And coming on 1 August...

    Check out our new project: Bondfinger. You can keep up with all the news on Twitter and Facebook. One week to go!



  • Episode 36: A Sociopathic Child

    19 July 2015 (5:57am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 42 minutes and 43 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    As our flight through Tom Baker's first season comes to an end, we pull on a latex mask, strap on some bombs, fill our pockets with gold dust and drop down into Wookey Hole to discuss Revenge of the Cybermen.

    Buy the stories!

    Revenge of the Cybermen was released on DVD in 2010. It can be bought by itself in the US (Amazon US), but in the UK and Australia it was released in a box set along with Silver Nemesis (Amazon UK).

    Links and notes

    In Unnatural Selection, a Season 2 episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, Dr Pulaski (Diana Muldaur) is cured of some terrible aging makeup by a quick trip through the matter transporters. Coincidence? Probably.

    The 1970s Japanese TV Series Saiyuki was dubbed into English by the BBC and broadcast under the title Monkey in the UK and Australia, with David Collings (Vorus) as the eponymous Monkey God. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation often ran it in the traditional 6.30 PM weekday timeslot that rightfully belonged to Doctor Who.

    Brendan's mysterious claim that Kellman was a collector of James Bond memorabilia will become clear if you just check out this page here.

    Cottage Under Siege was a brilliant Doctor Who fanzine from the wilderness years, edited by Neil Corry and Gareth Roberts. There were three issues, published in 1993 and 1994. I'd love to see it again. Anyone?

    Fans of using orographically enhanced toilet rolls to simulate asteroids will also enjoy the Blakes 7 Season 4 title sequence.

    And for all of you who are mystified by Sarah's hat in Robot, perhaps this picture of Mia Farrow in The Great Gatsby (1974) will clear things up.

    Picks of the week Todd and Nathan

    The 60 minutes LP version of Genesis of the Daleks was released in 1978. It is still available on Audible. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Todd

    The Big Finish audio The Relics of Jegg-Sau sees the delightful Bernice Summerfield facing the K1 robot from, er, Robot.

    Richard

    The Doctor Who Monster Book, by Terrance Dicks, was published by Target Books in 1975. It was Nathan's first introduction to Doctor Who, so we have that to thank it for. It is, sadly, currently out of print.

    Harry Sullivan's War, by Ian Marter, was a spy thriller published by Target Books in 1986, in the same month as Marter's death. It's out of print too, but if you're keen you can almost certainly get hold of a second-hand copy through Amazon.

    Brendan

    I, Davros is a series of four Big Finish audios chronicling Davros's life from his teens up until the events of Genesis of the Daleks.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard did have a Twitter account once, but he spoke to it in ALGOL that one time and it exploded. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or Roger Murray-Leach will come over to your house and strew mannequins in all your hallways.

    And coming on 1 August...

    Check out our new project: Bondfinger. You can keep up with all the news on Twitter and Facebook. It's getting closer every day!



  • A Sociopathic Child

    19 July 2015 (5:37am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 42 minutes and 43 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    As our flight through Tom Baker's first season comes to an end, we pull on a latex mask, strap on some bombs, fill our pockets with gold dust and drop down into Wookey Hole to discuss Revenge of the Cybermen.

    Buy the stories!

    Revenge of the Cybermen was released on DVD in 2010. It can be bought by itself in the US (Amazon US), but in the UK and Australia it was released in a box set along with Silver Nemesis (Amazon UK).

    Links and notes

    In [Unnatural Selection](http://en.memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Unnatural_Selection_(episode)), a Season 2 episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, Dr Pulaski (Diana Muldaur) is cured of some terrible aging makeup by a quick trip through the matter transporters. Coincidence? Probably.

    The 1970s Japanese TV Series Saiyuki was dubbed into English by the BBC and broadcast under the title Monkey in the UK and Australia, with David Collings (Vorus) as the eponymous Monkey God. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation often ran it in the traditional 6.30 PM weekday timeslot that rightfully belonged to Doctor Who.

    Brendan's mysterious claim that Kellman was a collector of James Bond memorabilia will become clear if you just check out this page here.

    Cottage Under Siege was a brilliant Doctor Who fanzine from the wilderness years, edited by Neil Corry and Gareth Roberts. There were three issues, published in 1993 and 1994. I'd love to see it again. Anyone?

    Fans of using orographically enhanced toilet rolls to simulate asteroids will also enjoy the Blakes 7 Season 4 title sequence.

    And for all of you who are mystified by Sarah's hat in Robot, perhaps this picture of Mia Farrow in The Great Gatsby (1974) will clear things up.

    Picks of the week Todd and Nathan

    The 60 minutes LP version of Genesis of the Daleks was released in 1978. It is still available on Audible. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Todd

    The Big Finish audio The Relics of Jegg-Sau sees the delightful Bernice Summerfield facing the K1 robot from, er, Robot.

    Richard

    The Doctor Who Monster Book, by Terrance Dicks, was published by Target Books in 1975. It was Nathan's first introduction to Doctor Who, so we have that to thank it for. It is, sadly, currently out of print.

    [Harry Sullivan's War](http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/Harry_Sullivan's_War_(novel)), by Ian Marter, was a spy thriller published by Target Books in 1986, in the same month as Marter's death. It's out of print too, but if you're keen you can almost certainly get hold of a second-hand copy through Amazon.

    Brendan

    I, Davros is a series of four Big Finish audios chronicling Davros's life from his teens up until the events of Genesis of the Daleks.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard did have a Twitter account once, but he spoke to it in ALGOL that one time and it exploded. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or Roger Murray-Leach will come over to your house and strew mannequins in all your hallways.

    And coming on 1 August...

    Check out our new project: Bondfinger. You can keep up with all the news on Twitter and Facebook. It's getting closer every day!



  • Episode 36 A Sociopathic Child

    19 July 2015 (5:37am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 42 minutes and 43 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    As our flight through Tom Baker's first season comes to an end, we pull on a latex mask, strap on some bombs, fill our pockets with gold dust and drop down into Wookey Hole to discuss Revenge of the Cybermen.

    Buy the stories!

    Revenge of the Cybermen was released on DVD in 2010. It can be bought by itself in the US (Amazon US), but in the UK and Australia it was released in a box set along with Silver Nemesis (Amazon UK).

    Links and notes

    In [Unnatural Selection](http://en.memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Unnatural_Selection_(episode)), a Season 2 episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, Dr Pulaski (Diana Muldaur) is cured of some terrible aging makeup by a quick trip through the matter transporters. Coincidence? Probably.

    The 1970s Japanese TV Series Saiyuki was dubbed into English by the BBC and broadcast under the title Monkey in the UK and Australia, with David Collings (Vorus) as the eponymous Monkey God. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation often ran it in the traditional 6.30 PM weekday timeslot that rightfully belonged to Doctor Who.

    Brendan's mysterious claim that Kellman was a collector of James Bond memorabilia will become clear if you just check out this page here.

    Cottage Under Siege was a brilliant Doctor Who fanzine from the wilderness years, edited by Neil Corry and Gareth Roberts. There were three issues, published in 1993 and 1994. I'd love to see it again. Anyone?

    Fans of using orographically enhanced toilet rolls to simulate asteroids will also enjoy the Blakes 7 Season 4 title sequence.

    And for all of you who are mystified by Sarah's hat in Robot, perhaps this picture of Mia Farrow in The Great Gatsby (1974) will clear things up.

    Picks of the week Todd and Nathan

    The 60 minutes LP version of Genesis of the Daleks was released in 1978. It is still available on Audible. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

    Todd

    The Big Finish audio The Relics of Jegg-Sau sees the delightful Bernice Summerfield facing the K1 robot from, er, Robot.

    Richard

    The Doctor Who Monster Book, by Terrance Dicks, was published by Target Books in 1975. It was Nathan's first introduction to Doctor Who, so we have that to thank it for. It is, sadly, currently out of print.

    [Harry Sullivan's War](http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/Harry_Sullivan's_War_(novel)), by Ian Marter, was a spy thriller published by Target Books in 1986, in the same month as Marter's death. It's out of print too, but if you're keen you can almost certainly get hold of a second-hand copy through Amazon.

    Brendan

    I, Davros is a series of four Big Finish audios chronicling Davros's life from his teens up until the events of Genesis of the Daleks.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard did have a Twitter account once, but he spoke to it in ALGOL that one time and it exploded. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or Roger Murray-Leach will come over to your house and strew mannequins in all your hallways.

    And coming on 1 August...

    Check out our new project: Bondfinger. You can keep up with all the news on Twitter and Facebook. It's getting closer every day!



  • Episode 35: Bring Back the Drahvins

    12 July 2015 (1:59am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 46 minutes and 14 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Our weekly flight through Tom Baker's first season continues with an episode made entirely of thirty foot thick reinforced concrete. That's right, it's time for that 1975 classic, Genesis of the Daleks!

    Buy the story!

    Genesis of the Daleks was released on DVD way back in 2006. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Commedia dell'arte is a genre of theatrical comedy featuring an array of various stock characters. It dates from 16th century Italy, but is based on a tradition that goes all the way back to Greek New Comedy from the end of the fourth century BC. So does that make Davros just the latest iteration of Pantalone?

    Severin is the hero of Venus in Furs (1870), a novella written by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, who gave his name to something called masochism. Probably best not to look that word up on Google.

    The Time Lord is dressed as Death from Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal (1957). Here is a version by French and Saunders. And this version comes from the first season of The Micallef Programme.

    Fans of having no idea of what is going on will enjoy this article on Jacques Lacan from the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

    Sadly, I'm unable to locate the Parliamentary speech made by a Conservative MP in the 1990s, in which he quoted Davros's virus speech from Part 5 of this story. Fact fans will be able to corroborate its historicity, however, by referring to Miles and Wood's About Time volume 4. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is simply enjoying the view. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll sneak into your house and steal all your etheric beam locators.

    And coming on 1 August...

    Check out our new project: Bondfinger. You can keep up with all the news on Twitter and Facebook. We're very excited about it!



  • Episode 35 Bring Back the Drahvins

    12 July 2015 (1:59am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 46 minutes and 14 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Our weekly flight through Tom Baker's first season continues with an episode made entirely of thirty foot thick reinforced concrete. That's right, it's time for that 1975 classic, Genesis of the Daleks!

    Buy the story!

    Genesis of the Daleks was released on DVD way back in 2006. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Commedia dell'arte is a genre of theatrical comedy featuring an array of various stock characters. It dates from 16th century Italy, but is based on a tradition that goes all the way back to Greek New Comedy from the end of the fourth century BC. So does that make Davros just the latest iteration of Pantalone?

    Severin is the hero of Venus in Furs (1870), a novella written by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, who gave his name to something called masochism. Probably best not to look that word up on Google.

    The Time Lord is dressed as Death from Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal (1957). Here is a version by French and Saunders. And this version comes from the first season of The Micallef Programme.

    Fans of having no idea of what is going on will enjoy this article on Jacques Lacan from the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

    Sadly, I'm unable to locate the Parliamentary speech made by a Conservative MP in the 1990s, in which he quoted Davros's virus speech from Part 5 of this story. Fact fans will be able to corroborate its historicity, however, by referring to Miles and Wood's About Time volume 4. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is simply enjoying the view. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll sneak into your house and steal all your etheric beam locators.

    And coming on 1 August...

    Check out our new project: Bondfinger. You can keep up with all the news on Twitter and Facebook. We're very excited about it!



  • Bring Back the Drahvins

    12 July 2015 (1:59am GMT)
    Episode Duration: 46 minutes and 14 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    Our weekly flight through Tom Baker's first season continues with an episode made entirely of thirty foot thick reinforced concrete. That's right, it's time for that 1975 classic, Genesis of the Daleks!

    Buy the story!

    Genesis of the Daleks was released on DVD way back in 2006. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Commedia dell'arte is a genre of theatrical comedy featuring an array of various stock characters. It dates from 16th century Italy, but is based on a tradition that goes all the way back to Greek New Comedy from the end of the fourth century BC. So does that make Davros just the latest iteration of Pantalone?

    Severin is the hero of Venus in Furs (1870), a novella written by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, who gave his name to something called masochism. Probably best not to look that word up on Google.

    The Time Lord is dressed as Death from Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal (1957). Here is a version by French and Saunders. And this version comes from the first season of The Micallef Programme.

    Fans of having no idea of what is going on will enjoy this article on Jacques Lacan from the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

    Sadly, I'm unable to locate the Parliamentary speech made by a Conservative MP in the 1990s, in which he quoted Davros's virus speech from Part 5 of this story. Fact fans will be able to corroborate its historicity, however, by referring to Miles and Wood's About Time volume 4. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is simply enjoying the view. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll sneak into your house and steal all your etheric beam locators.

    And coming on 1 August...

    Check out our new project: Bondfinger. You can keep up with all the news on Twitter and Facebook. We're very excited about it!



  • Choc Bit Breast Plates

    4 July 2015 (10:26pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 32 minutes and 58 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, Flight Through Entirety is on location in Dartmoor, testing our resistance to fear, burning, pressure, fluid deprivation and immersion in liquids, as we discuss the third story of Tom Baker's first season, The Sontaran Experiment.

    Buy the story!

    The Sontaran Experiment was released on DVD in 2006/2007. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Fans of posh white people living in orbital space stations will enjoy The Ark in Space, of course, and also Elysium (2013), which makes reasonably good use of Jodie Foster, whatever Brendan says.

    Fans of dead teenagers will enjoy The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974).

    Dr Josef Mengele worked as an SS Officer in Auschwitz and performed brutal and sadistic experiments on some of the prisoners, as well as assigning many to the gas chambers.

    Fans of the Sontaran insectoid robot will enjoy this photograph of the Canada Water Library in Southwark, which looks remarkably like it.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @brandybongos, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is here too. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll hide an inflatable snake somewhere where you least expect to find it.



  • Episode 34 Choc Bit Breast Plates

    4 July 2015 (10:26pm GMT)
    Episode Duration: 32 minutes and 58 seconds

    Direct Podcast Download

    This week, Flight Through Entirety is on location in Dartmoor, testing our resistance to fear, burning, pressure, fluid deprivation and immersion in liquids, as we discuss the third story of Tom Baker's first season, The Sontaran Experiment.

    Buy the story!

    The Sontaran Experiment was released on DVD in 2006/2007. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

    Links and notes

    Fans of posh white people living in orbital space stations will enjoy The Ark in Space, of course, and also Elysium (2013), which makes reasonably good use of Jodie Foster, whatever Brendan says.

    Fans of dead teenagers will enjoy The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974).

    Dr Josef Mengele worked as an SS Officer in Auschwitz and performed brutal and sadistic experiments on some of the prisoners, as well as assigning many to the gas chambers.

    Fans of the Sontaran insectoid robot will enjoy this photograph of the Canada Water Library in Southwark, which looks remarkably like it.

    Follow us!

    Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is here too. You can follow the podcast on Twitter as @FTEpodcast.

    We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. And please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll hide an inflatable snake somewhere where you least expect to find it.



 
Dormant Podcasts